The Relationship Between Non-Orthographic Language Abilities and Reading Performance in Chronic Aphasia: An Exploration of the Primary Systems Hypothesis Purpose This study investigated the relationship between non-orthographic language abilities and reading in order to examine assumptions of the primary systems hypothesis and further our understanding of language processing poststroke. Method Performance on non-orthographic semantic, phonologic, and syntactic tasks, as well as oral reading and reading comprehension tasks, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 10, 2018
The Relationship Between Non-Orthographic Language Abilities and Reading Performance in Chronic Aphasia: An Exploration of the Primary Systems Hypothesis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth Brookshire Madden
    School of Communication Science and Disorders, Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Tim Conway
    The Morris Center, Gainesville, FL
  • Maya L. Henry
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Texas at Austin
  • Kristie A. Spencer
    Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Kathryn M. Yorkston
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Diane L. Kendall
    Department of Speech & Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Elizabeth Brookshire Madden: ebmadden@fsu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Charles Ellis
    Editor: Charles Ellis×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 10, 2018
The Relationship Between Non-Orthographic Language Abilities and Reading Performance in Chronic Aphasia: An Exploration of the Primary Systems Hypothesis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2018, Vol. 61, 3038-3054. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-18-0058
History: Received February 14, 2018 , Revised June 20, 2018 , Accepted July 20, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2018, Vol. 61, 3038-3054. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-18-0058
History: Received February 14, 2018; Revised June 20, 2018; Accepted July 20, 2018

Purpose This study investigated the relationship between non-orthographic language abilities and reading in order to examine assumptions of the primary systems hypothesis and further our understanding of language processing poststroke.

Method Performance on non-orthographic semantic, phonologic, and syntactic tasks, as well as oral reading and reading comprehension tasks, was assessed in 43 individuals with aphasia. Correlation and regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between these measures. In addition, analyses of variance examined differences within and between reading groups (within normal limits, phonological, deep, or global alexia).

Results Results showed that non-orthographic language abilities were significantly related to reading abilities. Semantics was most predictive of regular and irregular word reading, whereas phonology was most predictive of pseudohomophone and nonword reading. Written word and paragraph comprehension were primarily supported by semantics, whereas written sentence comprehension was related to semantic, phonologic, and syntactic performance. Finally, severity of alexia was found to reflect severity of semantic and phonologic impairment.

Conclusions Findings support the primary systems view of language by showing that non-orthographic language abilities and reading abilities are closely linked. This preliminary work requires replication and extension; however, current results highlight the importance of routine, integrated assessment and treatment of spoken and written language in aphasia.

Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.7403963

Acknowledgments
To complete this work, the first author was supported by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation New Century Scholars Doctoral Scholarship and the University of Washington Research Training in Speech & Hearing Sciences National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders training grant (T32000033).
The authors would like to thank Lauren Belongia, Shanni Gellar, Nicole Okada, and Alexa Wilkenson for their assistance on this project and the dedicated participants with aphasia who volunteered to take part in this study.
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