Basic Measures of Prosody in Spontaneous Speech of Children With Early and Late Cochlear Implantation Purpose Relative to normally hearing (NH) peers, the speech of children with cochlear implants (CIs) has been found to have deviations such as a high fundamental frequency, elevated jitter and shimmer, and inadequate intonation. However, two important dimensions of prosody (temporal and spectral) have not been systematically investigated. Given that, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 10, 2018
Basic Measures of Prosody in Spontaneous Speech of Children With Early and Late Cochlear Implantation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daan J. van de Velde
    Leiden University Centre for Linguistics, the Netherlands
    Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, the Netherlands
  • Johan H. M. Frijns
    Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, the Netherlands
    Leiden University Medical Center, the Netherlands
  • Mieke Beers
    Leiden University Medical Center, the Netherlands
  • Vincent J. van Heuven
    Department of Hungarian and Applied Linguistics, Pannon Egyetem, Veszprém, Hungary
  • Claartje C. Levelt
    Leiden University Centre for Linguistics, the Netherlands
    Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, the Netherlands
  • Jeroen Briaire
    Leiden University Medical Center, the Netherlands
  • Niels O. Schiller
    Leiden University Centre for Linguistics, the Netherlands
    Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition, the Netherlands
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Daan J. van de Velde: d.j.van.de.velde@hum.leidenuniv.nl
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
  • Editor: Megan McAuliffe
    Editor: Megan McAuliffe×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 10, 2018
Basic Measures of Prosody in Spontaneous Speech of Children With Early and Late Cochlear Implantation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2018, Vol. 61, 3075-3094. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0233
History: Received June 16, 2017 , Revised February 10, 2018 , Accepted July 5, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2018, Vol. 61, 3075-3094. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0233
History: Received June 16, 2017; Revised February 10, 2018; Accepted July 5, 2018

Purpose Relative to normally hearing (NH) peers, the speech of children with cochlear implants (CIs) has been found to have deviations such as a high fundamental frequency, elevated jitter and shimmer, and inadequate intonation. However, two important dimensions of prosody (temporal and spectral) have not been systematically investigated. Given that, in general, the resolution in CI hearing is best for the temporal dimension and worst for the spectral dimension, we expected this hierarchy to be reflected in the amount of CI speech's deviation from NH speech. Deviations, however, were expected to diminish with increasing device experience.

Method Of 9 Dutch early- and late-implanted (division at 2 years of age) children and 12 hearing age-matched NH controls, spontaneous speech was recorded at 18, 24, and 30 months after implantation (CI) or birth (NH). Six spectral and temporal outcome measures were compared between groups, sessions, and genders.

Results On most measures, interactions of Group and/or Gender with Session were significant. For CI recipients as compared with controls, performance on temporal measures was not in general more deviant than spectral measures, although differences were found for individual measures. The late-implanted group had a tendency to be closer to the NH group than the early-implanted group. Groups converged over time.

Conclusions Results did not support the phonetic dimension hierarchy hypothesis, suggesting that the appropriateness of the production of basic prosodic measures does not depend on auditory resolution. Rather, it seems to depend on the amount of control necessary for speech production.

Acknowledgments
We are thankful to the Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition for supporting this research. We are also grateful to Jos Pacilly of the Leiden University Phonetics Laboratory for support involving signal processing. We thank Walter Verlaan of the LUMC, who helped with software and hardware issues related to recording and digitization. Statistician Vincent Buurman of the Faculty of Social Sciences helped us tremendously in analyzing the data. We finally thank Cesko Voeten and Xander Vertegaal for help regarding interjudge reliability assessment of phonetic analyses.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access