Data-Driven Classification of Dysarthria Profiles in Children With Cerebral Palsy Purpose The objectives of this study were to examine different speech profiles among children with dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy (CP) and to characterize the effect of different speech profiles on intelligibility. Method Twenty 5-year-old children with dysarthria secondary to CP and 20 typically developing children were included ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 10, 2018
Data-Driven Classification of Dysarthria Profiles in Children With Cerebral Palsy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristen M. Allison
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Katherine C. Hustad
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Kristen M. Allison, who is now at the Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, MA: k.allison@northeastern.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
  • Editor: Bharath Chandrasekaran
    Editor: Bharath Chandrasekaran×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Voice Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 10, 2018
Data-Driven Classification of Dysarthria Profiles in Children With Cerebral Palsy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2018, Vol. 61, 2837-2853. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0356
History: Received September 19, 2017 , Revised February 16, 2018 , Accepted June 26, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2018, Vol. 61, 2837-2853. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0356
History: Received September 19, 2017; Revised February 16, 2018; Accepted June 26, 2018

Purpose The objectives of this study were to examine different speech profiles among children with dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy (CP) and to characterize the effect of different speech profiles on intelligibility.

Method Twenty 5-year-old children with dysarthria secondary to CP and 20 typically developing children were included in this study. Six acoustic and perceptual speech measures were selected to quantify a range of segmental and suprasegmental speech characteristics and were measured from children's sentence productions. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify naturally occurring subgroups of children who had similar profiles of speech features.

Results Results revealed 4 naturally occurring speech clusters among children: 1 cluster of children with typical development and 3 clusters of children with dysarthria secondary to CP. Two of the 3 dysarthria clusters had statistically equivalent intelligibility levels but significantly differed in articulation rate and degree of hypernasality.

Conclusion This study provides initial evidence that different speech profiles exist among 5-year-old children with dysarthria secondary to CP, even among children with similar intelligibility levels, suggesting the potential for developing a pediatric dysarthria classification system that could be used to stratify children with dysarthria into meaningful subgroups for studying speech motor development and efficacy of interventions.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded by Grants R01DC009411 (awarded to Dr. Katherine Hustad) and 1F31DC013925-01 (awarded to Dr. Kristen Allison) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Support was also provided by the Waisman Center core grant, P30HD03352, from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. We would like to thank Gary Weismer for his insight and advice on this project and Luke Annear for his assistance with data analysis. We would also like to thank the families and children who participated in this project.
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