Identification of Affective State Change in Adults With Aphasia Using Speech Acoustics Purpose The current study aimed to identify objective acoustic measures related to affective state change in the speech of adults with post-stroke aphasia. Method The speech of 20 post-stroke adults with aphasia was recorded during picture description and administration of the Western Aphasia Battery–Revised (Kertesz, 2006). In addition, ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 10, 2018
Identification of Affective State Change in Adults With Aphasia Using Speech Acoustics
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephanie Gillespie
    School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta
  • Jacqueline Laures-Gore
    Communication Disorders Program, Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Elliot Moore
    School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta
  • Matthew Farina
    Communication Disorders Program, Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Scott Russell
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, GA
  • Benjamin Haaland
    Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Stephanie Gillespie: s.gillespie812@gmail.com
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   December 10, 2018
Identification of Affective State Change in Adults With Aphasia Using Speech Acoustics
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2018, Vol. 61, 2906-2916. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0057
History: Received February 10, 2017 , Revised May 10, 2017 , Accepted June 14, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2018, Vol. 61, 2906-2916. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0057
History: Received February 10, 2017; Revised May 10, 2017; Accepted June 14, 2018

Purpose The current study aimed to identify objective acoustic measures related to affective state change in the speech of adults with post-stroke aphasia.

Method The speech of 20 post-stroke adults with aphasia was recorded during picture description and administration of the Western Aphasia Battery–Revised (Kertesz, 2006). In addition, participants completed the Self-Assessment Manikin (Bradley & Lang, 1994) and the Stress Scale (Tobii Dynavox, 1981–2016) before and after the language tasks. Speech from each participant was used to detect a change in affective state test scores between the beginning and ending speech.

Results Machine learning revealed moderate success in classifying depression, minimal success in predicting depression and stress numeric scores, and minimal success in classifying changes in affective state class between the beginning and ending speech.

Conclusions The results suggest the existence of objectively measurable aspects of speech that may be used to identify changes in acute affect from adults with aphasia. This work is exploratory and hypothesis-generating; more work will be needed to make conclusive claims. Further work in this area could lead to automated tools to assist clinicians with their diagnoses of stress, depression, and other forms of affect in adults with aphasia.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by the Emory-Georgia Institute of Technology Healthcare Innovation Program and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award UL1TR000454, awarded to Elliot Moore, Jacqueline Laures-Gore, and Scott Russell. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (Grant DGE-1148903) awarded to Stephanie Gillespie. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health or the National Science Foundation.
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