Prevalence of Publication Bias Tests in Speech, Language, and Hearing Research Purpose The purpose of this research note is to systematically document the extent that researchers who publish in American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) journals search for and include unpublished literature in their meta-analyses and test for publication bias. Method This research note searched all ASHA peer-reviewed journals for published ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 10, 2018
Prevalence of Publication Bias Tests in Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jason C. Chow
    Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jason C. Chow: jcchow@vcu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Geralyn Timler
    Editor: Geralyn Timler×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language / Research Notes
Research Note   |   December 10, 2018
Prevalence of Publication Bias Tests in Speech, Language, and Hearing Research
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2018, Vol. 61, 3055-3063. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-18-0098
History: Received March 8, 2018 , Revised April 21, 2018 , Accepted June 11, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2018, Vol. 61, 3055-3063. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-18-0098
History: Received March 8, 2018; Revised April 21, 2018; Accepted June 11, 2018

Purpose The purpose of this research note is to systematically document the extent that researchers who publish in American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) journals search for and include unpublished literature in their meta-analyses and test for publication bias.

Method This research note searched all ASHA peer-reviewed journals for published meta-analyses and reviewed all qualifying articles for characteristics related to the acknowledgment and assessment of publication bias.

Results Of meta-analyses published in ASHA journals, 75% discuss publication in some form; however, less than 50% test for publication bias. Further, only 38% (n = 11) interpreted the findings of these tests.

Conclusion Findings reveal that more attention is needed to the presence and impact of publication bias. This research note concludes with 5 recommendations for addressing publication bias.

Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.7268648

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