The Coexistence of Disabling Conditions in Children Who Stutter: Evidence From the National Health Interview Survey Purpose Stuttering is a disorder that has been associated with coexisting developmental disorders. To date, detailed descriptions of the coexistence of such conditions have not consistently emerged in the literature. Identifying and understanding these conditions can be important to the overall management of children who stutter (CWS). The objective of ... Research Note
Newly Published
Research Note  |   November 06, 2018
The Coexistence of Disabling Conditions in Children Who Stutter: Evidence From the National Health Interview Survey
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patrick M. Briley
    Communication Equity and Outcomes Laboratory, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Charles Ellis, Jr.
    Communication Equity and Outcomes Laboratory, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Patrick M. Briley: brileypa@ecu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
  • Editor: Patricia Zebrowski
    Editor: Patricia Zebrowski×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Special Populations / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Newly Published / Research Note
Research Note   |   November 06, 2018
The Coexistence of Disabling Conditions in Children Who Stutter: Evidence From the National Health Interview Survey
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0378
History: Received October 3, 2017 , Revised February 16, 2018 , Accepted July 5, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0378
History: Received October 3, 2017; Revised February 16, 2018; Accepted July 5, 2018

Purpose Stuttering is a disorder that has been associated with coexisting developmental disorders. To date, detailed descriptions of the coexistence of such conditions have not consistently emerged in the literature. Identifying and understanding these conditions can be important to the overall management of children who stutter (CWS). The objective of this study was to generate a profile of the existence of disabling developmental conditions among CWS using national data.

Method Six years of data from the National Health Interview Survey (2010–2015) were analyzed for this project. The sample consisted of children whose respondents clearly indicated the presence or absence of stuttering. Chi-square tests of independence were used for comparing categorical variables; and independent-samples t tests, for comparing continuous variables. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used for determining the odds of having a coexisting disabling developmental condition.

Results This study sample included 62,450 children, of which 1,231 were CWS. Overall, the presence of at least 1 disabling developmental condition was 5.5 times higher in CWS when compared with children who do not stutter. The presence of stuttering was also associated with higher odds of each of the following coexisting developmental conditions: intellectual disability (odds ratio [OR] = 6.67, p < .001), learning disability (OR = 5.45, p < .001), attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder/attention-deficit disorder (OR = 3.09, p < .001), seizures (OR = 7.52, p < .001), autism/Asperger's/pervasive developmental disorder (OR = 5.48, p < .001), and any other developmental delay (OR = 7.10, p < .001).

Conclusion Evidence from the National Health Interview Survey suggests a higher prevalence of coexisting developmental disabilities in CWS. The existence of coexisting disabling developmental conditions should be considered as part of an overall management plan for CWS.

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