Chiari Type I Malformation Associated With Verbal Fluency Impairment Purpose Chiari malformation (CM) Type I is a rare disorder that implies an anomaly in the craniocervical junction, where one or both cerebellar tonsils are displaced below the foramen magnum into the cervical spinal channel. Research carried out regarding cognitive symptoms such as verbal fluency is scarce. The aim of ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   October 05, 2018
Chiari Type I Malformation Associated With Verbal Fluency Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Esther Lázaro
    Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain
  • Maitane García
    Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain
  • Ane Ibarrola
    Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain
  • Imanol Amayra
    Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain
  • Juan Francisco López-Paz
    Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain
  • Oscar Martínez
    Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain
  • Manuel Pérez
    Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain
  • Sarah Berrocoso
    Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain
  • Mohammad Al-Rashaida
    Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain
  • Alicia Aurora Rodríguez
    Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain
  • Paula Fernández
    Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain
  • Paula María Luna
    Department of Personality, Evaluation and Psychological Treatments, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Deusto, Bilbao, Spain
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Esther Lázaro: estherlazaro@deusto.es
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   October 05, 2018
Chiari Type I Malformation Associated With Verbal Fluency Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0465
History: Received December 19, 2017 , Revised February 1, 2018 , Accepted March 20, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0465
History: Received December 19, 2017; Revised February 1, 2018; Accepted March 20, 2018

Purpose Chiari malformation (CM) Type I is a rare disorder that implies an anomaly in the craniocervical junction, where one or both cerebellar tonsils are displaced below the foramen magnum into the cervical spinal channel. Research carried out regarding cognitive symptoms such as verbal fluency is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate whether verbal fluency is impaired in a CM clinical group compared to a group of healthy control individuals while controlling for depression and anxiety symptomatology.

Method For this purpose, 101 individuals were enrolled to take part in the study (51 CM, 50 healthy controls). The Controlled Oral Word Association Test (Benton, de Hamsher, & Sivan, 1983) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (Zigmond & Snaith, 1983) were administered.

Results Results showed significantly lower scores for the CM group in verbal fluency compared to the control group (p < .005). After performing an analysis of covariance to eliminate depression and anxiety symptomatology tendencies, it was observed that verbal fluency could not be predicted by this variable (p > .005).

Conclusions From the results of this study, it can be concluded that people suffering from CM exhibit less verbal fluency than healthy control individuals and that this difference is not caused by depression or anxiety.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank Asociación Nacional de Amigos de Arnold Chiari (A.N.A.C) and the Asociación de Chiari y Siringomielia del Principado de Asturias (ChiSPA) of Arnold Chiari of Spain.
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