Pilot Study of Audiometric Patterns in Fuchs Corneal Dystrophy Purpose Although Fuchs corneal dystrophy (FCD) is considered an eye disease, a small number of studies have identified genes related to both FCD and hearing loss. Whether FCD is related to hearing loss is unknown. Method This is a case–control study comparing pure-tone audiometry hearing thresholds in 180 ... Research Note
Newly Published
Research Note  |   October 02, 2018
Pilot Study of Audiometric Patterns in Fuchs Corneal Dystrophy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nicholas S. Reed
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
    Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD
  • Jennifer A. Deal
    Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD
    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
  • Matthew G. Huddle
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Joshua F. Betz
    Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD
    Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
  • Bethany E. Bailey
    The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Elyse J. McGlumphy
    The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Allen O. Eghrari
    The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • S. Amer Riazuddin
    The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Frank R. Lin
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
    Center on Aging and Health, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD
    Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD
  • John D. Gottsch
    The Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to John G. Gottsch: jgottsch@jhmi.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Editor: Steve Aiken
    Editor: Steve Aiken×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Newly Published / Research Note
Research Note   |   October 02, 2018
Pilot Study of Audiometric Patterns in Fuchs Corneal Dystrophy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-18-0088
History: Received March 14, 2018 , Revised May 11, 2018 , Accepted June 5, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-18-0088
History: Received March 14, 2018; Revised May 11, 2018; Accepted June 5, 2018

Purpose Although Fuchs corneal dystrophy (FCD) is considered an eye disease, a small number of studies have identified genes related to both FCD and hearing loss. Whether FCD is related to hearing loss is unknown.

Method This is a case–control study comparing pure-tone audiometry hearing thresholds in 180 patients with FCD from a hospital-based ophthalmology clinic with 2,575 population-based controls from a nationally representative survey, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (from cycles 2005-06 and 2009-10). Generalized estimating equations were used to compare mean better-hearing ear thresholds in the 2 groups adjusted for age, sex, race, and noise exposure.

Results Patients with FCD had higher hearing thresholds (worse hearing) in lower frequencies (mean difference at 0.5 kHz = 3.49 dB HL) and lower hearing thresholds (better hearing) in higher frequencies (difference at 4 kHz = −4.25 dB HL) compared with population-based controls.

Conclusion In the first study to use objectively measured hearing, FCD was associated with poorer low-frequency and better high-frequency audiometric thresholds than population controls. Further studies are needed to characterize this relationship.

Acknowledgments
The work was supported by National Eye Institute Grant R01 EY016835 and Kwok Research Fund, both awarded to John D. Gottsch, and the Johns Hopkins University Cochlear Center for Hearing and Public Health. Dr. Deal was supported by National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Aging Grant K01AG054693. Dr. Reed was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant 5KL2TR001077-05.
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