Perceptual Organization of Interrupted Speech and Text Purpose Visual recognition of interrupted text may predict speech intelligibility under adverse listening conditions. This study investigated the nature of the linguistic information and perceptual processes underlying this relationship. Method To directly compare the perceptual organization of interrupted speech and text, we examined the recognition of spoken and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 26, 2018
Perceptual Organization of Interrupted Speech and Text
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Valeriy Shafiro
    Department of Communication Disorders & Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL
  • Daniel Fogerty
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Kimberly Smith
    Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology, University of South Alabama, Mobile
  • Stanley Sheft
    Department of Communication Disorders & Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Valeriy Shafiro: valeriy_shafiro@rush.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Editor: Lori J. Leibold
    Editor: Lori J. Leibold×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 26, 2018
Perceptual Organization of Interrupted Speech and Text
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2018, Vol. 61, 2578-2588. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0477
History: Received December 22, 2017 , Revised March 23, 2018 , Accepted June 3, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2018, Vol. 61, 2578-2588. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0477
History: Received December 22, 2017; Revised March 23, 2018; Accepted June 3, 2018

Purpose Visual recognition of interrupted text may predict speech intelligibility under adverse listening conditions. This study investigated the nature of the linguistic information and perceptual processes underlying this relationship.

Method To directly compare the perceptual organization of interrupted speech and text, we examined the recognition of spoken and printed sentences interrupted at different rates in 14 adults with normal hearing. The interruption method approximated deletion and retention of rate-specific linguistic information (0.5–64 Hz) in speech by substituting either white space or silent intervals for text or speech in the original sentences.

Results A similar U-shaped pattern of cross-rate variation in performance was observed in both modalities, with minima at 2 Hz. However, at the highest and lowest interruption rates, recognition accuracy was greater for text than speech, whereas the reverse was observed at middle rates. An analysis of word duration and the frequency of word sampling across interruption rates suggested that the location of the function minima was influenced by perceptual reconstruction of whole words. Overall, the findings indicate a high degree of similarity in the perceptual organization of interrupted speech and text.

Conclusion The observed rate-specific variation in the perception of speech and text may potentially affect the degree to which recognition accuracy in one modality is predictive of the other.

Acknowledgments
Support was provided in part by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01-DC015465, awarded to Daniel Fogerty. Irraj Iftikhar provided research assistance supported in part by the South Carolina Honors College Science Undergraduate Research Funding Program. We are grateful to Deniz Başkent for the Dutch language information and references.
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