The Mandarin Version of the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V) and Its Reliability Purpose The purpose of this study is to develop the Mandarin version of the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V) and evaluate its reliability compared with the Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain (GRBAS). Method The Mandarin version of the CAPE-V tool was translated from the validated English version ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 26, 2018
The Mandarin Version of the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V) and Its Reliability
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Zhen Chen
    Department of Chinese Language and Literature, Fudan University, Shanghai, China
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-HNS, Fudan University Eye and ENT Hospital, Shanghai, China
  • Rui Fang
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-HNS, Fudan University Eye and ENT Hospital, Shanghai, China
  • Yi Zhang
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-HNS, Fudan University Eye and ENT Hospital, Shanghai, China
  • Pingjiang Ge
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-HNS, Guangdong General Hospital, China
  • Peiyun Zhuang
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-HNS, Xiamen University Zhongshan Hospital, Fujian, China
  • Adriana Chou
    Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Jack Jiang
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-HNS, Fudan University Eye and ENT Hospital, Shanghai, China
    Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jack Jiang: jjjiang@fudan.edu.cn
  • Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson
    Editor-in-Chief: Krista Wilkinson×
  • Editor: M. Preeti Sivasankar
    Editor: M. Preeti Sivasankar×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 26, 2018
The Mandarin Version of the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V) and Its Reliability
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2018, Vol. 61, 2451-2457. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0386
History: Received October 11, 2017 , Revised February 28, 2018 , Accepted March 23, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2018, Vol. 61, 2451-2457. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0386
History: Received October 11, 2017; Revised February 28, 2018; Accepted March 23, 2018

Purpose The purpose of this study is to develop the Mandarin version of the Consensus Auditory-Perceptual Evaluation of Voice (CAPE-V) and evaluate its reliability compared with the Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain (GRBAS).

Method The Mandarin version of the CAPE-V tool was translated from the validated English version with phonemic adaptations, content adjustment, and scale modification. Sixty dysphonic, 20 normal, and 20 repeated voice samples were included in this study. Ten of these were used for preassessment training; the remaining 90 were evaluated using the Mandarin CAPE-V and GRBAS for comparison of their interrater and intrarater reliabilities.

Results Intrarater reliability was measured by Pearson r for the CAPE-V and Spearman rho for the GRBAS. Average CAPE-V Pearson r ranged from 0.80 for strain to 0.91 for overall severity, compared with average GRBAS Spearman rho of 0.83 for strain to 0.89 for asthenia. Interrater reliability was measured by an intraclass coefficient (ICC). Average CAPE-V ICCs ranged from .57 for pitch to .81 for overall severity, compared with average GRBAS ICCs of .60 for asthenia to .83 for grade.

Conclusions The Mandarin CAPE-V addresses some limits of the English version. It also demonstrates good intrarater and interrater reliability, comparable to those of GRBAS.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by a grant from National Natural Science Foundation of China, Grant NSFC 81329001, awarded to Jack Jiang (PI).
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