Morphosyntax Production of Preschool Children With Hearing Loss: An Evaluation of the Extended Optional Infinitive and Surface Accounts Purpose The first aim of this study was to explore differences in profiles of morphosyntax production of preschool children with hearing loss (CHL) relative to age- and language-matched comparison groups. The second aim was to explore the potential of extending 2 long-standing theoretical accounts of morphosyntax weakness in children with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 19, 2018
Morphosyntax Production of Preschool Children With Hearing Loss: An Evaluation of the Extended Optional Infinitive and Surface Accounts
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Krystal L. Werfel
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Krystal L. Werfel: werfel@sc.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Lizbeth Finestack
    Editor: Lizbeth Finestack×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 19, 2018
Morphosyntax Production of Preschool Children With Hearing Loss: An Evaluation of the Extended Optional Infinitive and Surface Accounts
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2018, Vol. 61, 2313-2324. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0406
History: Received October 30, 2017 , Revised March 29, 2018 , Accepted May 22, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2018, Vol. 61, 2313-2324. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0406
History: Received October 30, 2017; Revised March 29, 2018; Accepted May 22, 2018

Purpose The first aim of this study was to explore differences in profiles of morphosyntax production of preschool children with hearing loss (CHL) relative to age- and language-matched comparison groups. The second aim was to explore the potential of extending 2 long-standing theoretical accounts of morphosyntax weakness in children with specific language impairment to preschool CHL.

Method This study examined conversational language samples to describe the accuracy and type of inaccurate productions of Brown's grammatical morphemes in 18 preschool CHL as compared with an age-matched group (±3 months, n = 18) and a language-matched group (±1 raw score point on an expressive language subtest, n = 18). Age ranged from 45 to 62 months. Performance across groups was compared. In addition, production accuracy of CHL on morphemes that varied by tense and duration was compared to assess the validity of extending theoretical accounts of children with specific language impairment to CHL.

Results CHL exhibited particular difficulty with morphosyntax relative to other aspects of language. In addition, differences across groups on accuracy and type of inaccurate productions were observed. Finally, a unified approach to explaining morphosyntax weakness in CHL was more appropriate than a linguistic- or perceptual-only approach.

Conclusions Taken together, the findings of this study support a unified theoretical account of morphosyntax weakness in CHL in which both tense and duration of morphemes play a role in morphosyntax production accuracy, with a more robust role for tense than duration.

Acknowledgments
Research reported in this article was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders of the National Institutes of Health under Award R03DC014535 (principal investigator: Krystal Werfel). Study data were collected and managed using REDCap electronic data capture tools hosted at the University of South Carolina. The content is solely the responsibility of the author and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Madison Anderson, Marissa Castaldo, Logan Douglass, Emily Metze, Addyson Pound, Gabriella Reynolds, Sara G. Straley, and Breanna Todd assisted with language sample transcription and coding. Their contributions are greatly appreciated.
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