Pairing New Words With Unfamiliar Objects: Comparing Children With and Without Cochlear Implants Purpose This study investigates differences between preschool children with cochlear implants and age-matched children with normal hearing during an initial stage in word learning to evaluate whether they (a) match novel words to unfamiliar objects and (b) solicit information about unfamiliar objects during play. Method Twelve preschool children ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   August 28, 2018
Pairing New Words With Unfamiliar Objects: Comparing Children With and Without Cochlear Implants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Emily Lund
    Davies School of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Emily Lund: e.lund@tcu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Lizbeth Finestack
    Editor: Lizbeth Finestack×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   August 28, 2018
Pairing New Words With Unfamiliar Objects: Comparing Children With and Without Cochlear Implants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0467
History: Received December 19, 2017 , Revised February 7, 2018 , Accepted May 25, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0467
History: Received December 19, 2017; Revised February 7, 2018; Accepted May 25, 2018

Purpose This study investigates differences between preschool children with cochlear implants and age-matched children with normal hearing during an initial stage in word learning to evaluate whether they (a) match novel words to unfamiliar objects and (b) solicit information about unfamiliar objects during play.

Method Twelve preschool children with cochlear implants and 12 children with normal hearing matched for age completed 2 experimental tasks. In the 1st task, children were asked to point to a picture that matched either a known word or a novel word. In the 2nd task, children were presented with unfamiliar objects during play and were given the opportunity to ask questions about those objects.

Results In Task 1, children with cochlear implants paired novel words with unfamiliar pictures in fewer trials than children with normal hearing. In Task 2, children with cochlear implants were less likely to solicit information about new objects than children with normal hearing. Performance on the 1st task, but not the 2nd, significantly correlated with expressive vocabulary standard scores of children with cochlear implants.

Conclusion This study provides preliminary evidence that children with cochlear implants approach mapping novel words to and soliciting information about unfamiliar objects differently than children with normal hearing.

Acknowledgments
The author gratefully acknowledges the support from the Texas Christian University Research and Creative Activities Fund.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access