Quantitative Analysis of Agrammatism in Agrammatic Primary Progressive Aphasia and Dominant Apraxia of Speech Purpose The aims of the study were to assess and compare grammatical deficits in written and spoken language production in subjects with agrammatic primary progressive aphasia (agPPA) and in subjects with agrammatism in the context of dominant apraxia of speech (DAOS) and to investigate neuroanatomical correlates. Method Eight ... Research Note
Research Note  |   September 19, 2018
Quantitative Analysis of Agrammatism in Agrammatic Primary Progressive Aphasia and Dominant Apraxia of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katerina A. Tetzloff
    Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Rene L. Utianski
    Department of Neurology, Division of Speech Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Joseph R. Duffy
    Department of Neurology, Division of Speech Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Heather M. Clark
    Department of Neurology, Division of Speech Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Edythe A. Strand
    Department of Neurology, Division of Speech Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Keith A. Josephs
    Department of Neurology, Division of Behavioral Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
    Department of Neurology, Division of Movement Disorders, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Jennifer L. Whitwell
    Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jennifer Whitwell: whitwell.jennifer@mayo.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Charles Ellis
    Editor: Charles Ellis×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Notes
Research Note   |   September 19, 2018
Quantitative Analysis of Agrammatism in Agrammatic Primary Progressive Aphasia and Dominant Apraxia of Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2018, Vol. 61, 2337-2346. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0474
History: Received December 21, 2017 , Revised April 18, 2018 , Accepted May 8, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2018, Vol. 61, 2337-2346. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0474
History: Received December 21, 2017; Revised April 18, 2018; Accepted May 8, 2018

Purpose The aims of the study were to assess and compare grammatical deficits in written and spoken language production in subjects with agrammatic primary progressive aphasia (agPPA) and in subjects with agrammatism in the context of dominant apraxia of speech (DAOS) and to investigate neuroanatomical correlates.

Method Eight agPPA and 21 DAOS subjects performed the picture description task of the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) both in writing and orally. Responses were transcribed and coded for linguistic analysis. agPPA and DAOS were compared to 13 subjects with primary progressive apraxia of speech (PPAOS) who did not have agrammatism. Spearman correlations were performed between the written and spoken variables. Patterns of atrophy in each group were compared, and relationships between the different linguistic measures and integrity of Broca's area were assessed.

Results agPPA and DAOS both showed lower mean length of utterance, fewer grammatical utterances, more nonutterances, more syntactic and semantic errors, and fewer complex utterances than PPAOS in writing and speech, as well as fewer correct verbs and nouns in speech. Only verb ratio and proportion of grammatical utterances correlated between modalities. agPPA and DAOS both showed greater involvement of Broca's area than PPAOS, and atrophy of Broca's area correlated with proportion of grammatical and ungrammatical utterances and semantic errors in writing and speech.

Conclusions agPPA and DAOS subjects showed similar patterns of agrammatism, although subjects performed differently when speaking versus writing. Integrity of Broca's area correlates with agrammatism.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant R01-DC010367 awarded to Keith A. Josephs and Grant R01-DC12519 awarded to Jennifer L. Whitwell.
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