Preference for Infant-Directed Speech in Infants With Hearing Aids: Effects of Early Auditory Experience Purpose It is well established that (a) infants prefer listening to infant-directed speech (IDS) over adult-directed speech (ADS), and (b) IDS facilitates speech, language, and cognitive development, compared with ADS. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether infants with hearing aids (HAs), similar to their peers with ... Research Note
Research Note  |   September 19, 2018
Preference for Infant-Directed Speech in Infants With Hearing Aids: Effects of Early Auditory Experience
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yuanyuan Wang
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus
    Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH
  • Tonya R. Bergeson
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, Butler University, Indianapolis, IN
  • Derek M. Houston
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus
    Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Yuanyuan Wang: Yuanyuan.Wang@osumc.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Editor: Lori J. Leibold
    Editor: Lori J. Leibold×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Notes
Research Note   |   September 19, 2018
Preference for Infant-Directed Speech in Infants With Hearing Aids: Effects of Early Auditory Experience
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2018, Vol. 61, 2431-2439. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-18-0086
History: Received March 13, 2018 , Revised April 13, 2018 , Accepted May 2, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2018, Vol. 61, 2431-2439. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-18-0086
History: Received March 13, 2018; Revised April 13, 2018; Accepted May 2, 2018
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose It is well established that (a) infants prefer listening to infant-directed speech (IDS) over adult-directed speech (ADS), and (b) IDS facilitates speech, language, and cognitive development, compared with ADS. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether infants with hearing aids (HAs), similar to their peers with normal hearing (NH), show a listening preference for IDS over ADS.

Method A total of 42 infants participated in the study. In Experiment 1, 9 infants with hearing loss, who had approximately 12 months of experience (mean chronological age of 17.57 months) with HAs, and 9 infants with NH, who had similar chronological age (17.54 months), were tested. In Experiment 2, 10 infants with hearing loss, who had approximately 4 months of experience (mean chronological age of 9.86 months) with HAs, and 14 infants with NH, who had similar chronological age (9.09 months), were tested. Infants were tested on their listening preference in 3 randomized blocks: IDS versus silence, ADS versus silence, and IDS versus ADS blocks, using the central fixation preference procedure.

Results Experiment 1 showed that infants with HAs, similar to their peers with NH, listened longer to both IDS and ADS relative to silence; however, neither infants with HAs nor infants with NH showed a listening preference for IDS over ADS. In Experiment 2, both infants with HAs and infants with NH showed a listening preference for IDS and ADS relative to silence; in addition, both groups preferred listening to IDS over ADS.

Conclusions Infants with HAs appear to have sufficient access to the acoustic cues in the speech that allow them to develop an age-equivalent IDS preference. This may be attributed to a combination of being able to use the hearing they do have before receiving HAs and early device fitting. Given previously demonstrated positive associations between IDS preference and language development, this research encourages early interventions focusing on maximizing early auditory experience in infants with hearing loss.

Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.6906365

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01 DC008581 to Derek M. Houston and Laura Dilley.
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