Using the Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) System to Investigate Cultural Differences in Conversational Turn Count Purpose This study investigates how the variables of culture and hearing status might influence the amount of parent–child talk families engage in throughout an average day. Method Seventeen Vietnamese and 8 Canadian families of children with hearing loss and 17 Vietnamese and 13 Canadian families with typically hearing ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 19, 2018
Using the Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) System to Investigate Cultural Differences in Conversational Turn Count
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hillary Ganek
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Ron Smyth
    University of Toronto Scarborough, Ontario, Canada
  • Stephanie Nixon
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Alice Eriks-Brophy
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Hillary Ganek: hillary.ganek@mail.utoronto.ca
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Geralyn Timler
    Editor: Geralyn Timler×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / International & Global / Normal Language Processing / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 19, 2018
Using the Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) System to Investigate Cultural Differences in Conversational Turn Count
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2018, Vol. 61, 2246-2258. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0370
History: Received September 28, 2017 , Revised January 15, 2018 , Accepted May 2, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 2018, Vol. 61, 2246-2258. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0370
History: Received September 28, 2017; Revised January 15, 2018; Accepted May 2, 2018

Purpose This study investigates how the variables of culture and hearing status might influence the amount of parent–child talk families engage in throughout an average day.

Method Seventeen Vietnamese and 8 Canadian families of children with hearing loss and 17 Vietnamese and 13 Canadian families with typically hearing children between the ages of 18 and 48 months old participated in this cross-comparison design study. Each child wore a Language ENvironment Analysis system digital language processor for 3 days. An automated vocal analysis then calculated an average conversational turn count (CTC) for each participant as the variable of investigation. The CTCs for the 4 groups were compared using a Kruskal–Wallis test and a set of planned pairwise comparisons.

Results The Canadian families participated in significantly more conversational turns than the Vietnamese families. No significant difference was found between the Vietnamese or the Canadian cohorts as a function of hearing status.

Conclusions Culture, but not hearing status, influences CTCs as derived by the Language ENvironment Analysis system. Clinicians should consider how cultural communication practices might influence their suggestions for language stimulation.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported by a grant from Mitacs Globalink. This study was made possible with the assistance of the Global Foundation for Children with Hearing Loss, the Thaun An Centre for Disabled Children, Hoa Lan Private Kindergarten, VOICE for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children, the Toronto District School Board, the Hospital for Sick Children, Children's Hearing and Speech Centre of British Columbia, the John McGivney Children's Centre, Creating Together Parkdale Family Resource Centre, the Bradford School of Dance, Toronto Public Libraries, and Ontario Early Years Centres and the LENA Research Foundation. Interpreter services were provided by Ton Tho Dang Khoa, Le Thi Nhon Hoa, Nguyen Bich Huyen, and Vu Thanh Phuong Nguyen. The authors would like to thank the reviewers for their excellent suggestions regarding the revisions of this article and all participating families.
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