Mandarin-Speaking, Kindergarten-Aged Children With Cochlear Implants Benefit From Natural F0 Patterns in the Use of Semantic Context During Speech Recognition Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which semantic context and F 0 contours affect speech recognition by Mandarin-speaking, kindergarten-aged children with cochlear implants (CIs). Method The experimental design manipulated two factors, that is, semantic context, by comparing the intelligibility of normal sentence ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 08, 2018
Mandarin-Speaking, Kindergarten-Aged Children With Cochlear Implants Benefit From Natural F0 Patterns in the Use of Semantic Context During Speech Recognition
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linjun Zhang
    College of Allied Health Sciences, Beijing Language and Culture University, China
  • Jiuju Wang
    Peking University Sixth Hospital, Beijing, China
    National Clinical Research Center for Mental Disorder & Key Laboratory of Mental Health, Ministry of Health (Peking University), Beijing, China
  • Tian Hong
    National Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning & IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, China
  • Yu Li
    National Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning & IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, China
  • Yang Zhang
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences and Center for Neurobehavioral Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Hua Shu
    National Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning & IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, China
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Linjun Zhang and Jiuju Wang contributed equally to this work.
    Linjun Zhang and Jiuju Wang contributed equally to this work.×
  • Correspondence to Hua Shu: shuhua@bnu.edu.cn
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Editor: Lori J. Leibold
    Editor: Lori J. Leibold×
Article Information
Hearing / Research Notes
Research Note   |   August 08, 2018
Mandarin-Speaking, Kindergarten-Aged Children With Cochlear Implants Benefit From Natural F0 Patterns in the Use of Semantic Context During Speech Recognition
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2018, Vol. 61, 2146-2152. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0327
History: Received September 1, 2017 , Revised January 3, 2018 , Accepted May 2, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2018, Vol. 61, 2146-2152. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0327
History: Received September 1, 2017; Revised January 3, 2018; Accepted May 2, 2018

Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which semantic context and F 0 contours affect speech recognition by Mandarin-speaking, kindergarten-aged children with cochlear implants (CIs).

Method The experimental design manipulated two factors, that is, semantic context, by comparing the intelligibility of normal sentence versus word list, and F 0 contours, by comparing the intelligibility of utterances with natural versus flat F 0 patterns. Twenty-two children with CIs completed a speech recognition test.

Results Children with CIs could use both semantic context and F 0 contours to assist speech recognition. Furthermore, natural F 0 patterns provided extra benefit when semantic context was present than when it was absent.

Conclusion Dynamic F 0 contours play an important role in speech recognition by Mandarin-speaking children with CIs despite the well-known limitation of CI devices in extracting F 0 information.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the Open Research Fund of the State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning Grant CNLYB1607, awarded to LZ, and by the National Key Basic Research Program of China Grant 2014CB846103, Natural Science Foundation of China Grant 31271082 and 81461130018, Beijing Municipal Science & Technology Commission Grant Z151100003915122, and Natural Science Foundation of Beijing Grant 7132119, awarded to HS. YZ was supported by the Grand Challenges Research Project Award and Brain Imaging Research Award from the University of Minnesota.
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