Treatment for Residual Rhotic Errors With High- and Low-Frequency Ultrasound Visual Feedback: A Single-Case Experimental Design Purpose The aim of this study was to explore how the frequency with which ultrasound visual feedback (UVF) is provided during speech therapy affects speech sound learning. Method Twelve children with residual speech errors affecting /ɹ/ participated in a multiple-baseline across-subjects design with 2 treatment conditions. One condition ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 08, 2018
Treatment for Residual Rhotic Errors With High- and Low-Frequency Ultrasound Visual Feedback: A Single-Case Experimental Design
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jonathan L. Preston
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Syracuse University, NY
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
  • Tara McAllister
    Department of Communicative Sciences & Disorders, New York University, New York
  • Emily Phillips
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
  • Suzanne Boyce
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Cincinnati, OH
  • Mark Tiede
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
  • Jackie S. Kim
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Columbia University, New York, NY
  • Douglas H. Whalen
    Program in Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, City University of New York Graduate Center, New York
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jonathan L. Preston: jopresto@syr.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
  • Editor: Bharath Chandrasekaran
    Editor: Bharath Chandrasekaran×
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 08, 2018
Treatment for Residual Rhotic Errors With High- and Low-Frequency Ultrasound Visual Feedback: A Single-Case Experimental Design
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2018, Vol. 61, 1875-1892. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0441
History: Received November 27, 2017 , Revised February 8, 2018 , Accepted April 3, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2018, Vol. 61, 1875-1892. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0441
History: Received November 27, 2017; Revised February 8, 2018; Accepted April 3, 2018

Purpose The aim of this study was to explore how the frequency with which ultrasound visual feedback (UVF) is provided during speech therapy affects speech sound learning.

Method Twelve children with residual speech errors affecting /ɹ/ participated in a multiple-baseline across-subjects design with 2 treatment conditions. One condition featured 8 hr of high-frequency UVF (HF; feedback on 89% of trials), whereas the other included 8 hr of lower-frequency UVF (LF; 44% of trials). The order of treatment conditions was counterbalanced across participants. All participants were treated on vocalic /ɹ/. Progress was tracked by measuring generalization on /ɹ/ in untreated words.

Results After the 1st treatment phase, participants who received the HF condition outperformed those who received LF. At the end of the 2-phase treatment, within-participant comparisons showed variability across individual outcomes in both HF and LF conditions. However, a group level analysis of this small sample suggested that participants whose treatment order was HF–LF made larger gains than those whose treatment order was LF–HF.

Conclusions The order HF–LF may represent a preferred order for UVF in speech therapy. This is consistent with empirical work and theoretical arguments suggesting that visual feedback may be particularly beneficial in the early stages of acquiring new speech targets.

Acknowledgments
Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders under Award Number R01DC013668 (D. Whalen, PI). Thanks to Olivia Harold, Jacquie Fetzner, Jose Ortiz, and Jessica Whittle for assistance with this project. Siemens Corporation provided a long-term loan of the ultrasound equipment used in this study. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.
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