Measuring Sound-Processor Thresholds for Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients Using Visual Reinforcement Audiometry via Telepractice Purpose The goal of this study was to test the feasibility of using telepractice for measuring behavioral thresholds (T levels) in young children with cochlear implants (CIs) using visual reinforcement audiometry (VRA). Specifically, we examined whether there were significant differences in T levels, test time, or measurement success rate between ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 08, 2018
Measuring Sound-Processor Thresholds for Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients Using Visual Reinforcement Audiometry via Telepractice
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michelle L. Hughes
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Jenny L. Goehring
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Joshua D. Sevier
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Sangsook Choi
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Michelle L. Hughes: mhughes3@unl.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Editor: Antje Ihlefeld
    Editor: Antje Ihlefeld×
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 08, 2018
Measuring Sound-Processor Thresholds for Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients Using Visual Reinforcement Audiometry via Telepractice
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2018, Vol. 61, 2115-2125. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0458
History: Received December 11, 2017 , Revised April 4, 2018 , Accepted April 6, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2018, Vol. 61, 2115-2125. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0458
History: Received December 11, 2017; Revised April 4, 2018; Accepted April 6, 2018

Purpose The goal of this study was to test the feasibility of using telepractice for measuring behavioral thresholds (T levels) in young children with cochlear implants (CIs) using visual reinforcement audiometry (VRA). Specifically, we examined whether there were significant differences in T levels, test time, or measurement success rate between in-person and remote test conditions.

Method Data were collected for 17 children, aged 1.1–3.4 years. A within-subject AB-BA (A, in-person; B, remote) study design was used, with data collection typically occurring over 2 visits. T levels were measured during each test session using VRA for one basal, middle, and apical electrode. Two additional outcome measures included test time and response success rate, the latter of which was calculated as the ratio of the number of electrode thresholds successfully measured versus attempted. All 3 outcome measures were compared between the in-person and remote sessions. Last, a parent/caregiver questionnaire was administered at the end of the study to evaluate subjective aspects of remote versus traditional CI programming.

Results Results showed no significant difference in T levels between in-person and remote test conditions. There were also no significant differences in test time or measurement success rate between the two conditions. The questionnaires indicated that 82% of parents or caregivers would use telepractice for routine CI programming visits some or all of the time if the option was available.

Conclusion Results from this study suggest that telepractice can be used successfully to set T levels for young children with CIs using VRA.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01 DC013281 and Grant P30 DC04662 and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Grant P20 GM109023, awarded to Boys Town National Research Hospital. The content of this project is solely the authors' responsibility and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders or the National Institutes of Health. The authors thank Sara Robinson, Jacquelyn Baudhuin, Margaret Miller, Rachel Scheperle, and Jamie Petersen for their assistance with the data collection and Roger Harpster, Todd Sanford, and Dave Jenkins for their technical assistance. Portions of this study were presented at the 3rd International Internet and Audiology Conference in Louisville, KY, July 27–28, 2017, and at the 2017 American Cochlear Implant Alliance conference in San Francisco, CA, July 27–29, 2017.
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