Parents' Perception of Health-Related Quality of Life in Children With Cochlear Implants: The Impact of Language Skills and Hearing Purpose The study compared how parents of children with cochlear implants (CIs) and parents of children with normal hearing perceive their children's health-related quality of life (HR-QOL). Method The sample consisted of 186 Norwegian-speaking children in the age span of 5;0–12;11 (years;months): 106 children with CIs (53% boys, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 08, 2018
Parents' Perception of Health-Related Quality of Life in Children With Cochlear Implants: The Impact of Language Skills and Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christiane Lingås Haukedal
    Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Special Needs Education, University of Oslo, Norway
  • Janne von Koss Torkildsen
    Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Special Needs Education, University of Oslo, Norway
  • Björn Lyxell
    Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linnaeus Centre, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Sweden
  • Ona Bø Wie
    Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Special Needs Education, University of Oslo, Norway
    Division of Surgery and Clinical Neuroscience, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Oslo University Hospital, Norway
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Christiane Lingås Haukedal: christiane.haukedal@isp.uio.no
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Editor: Daniel Fogerty
    Editor: Daniel Fogerty×
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 08, 2018
Parents' Perception of Health-Related Quality of Life in Children With Cochlear Implants: The Impact of Language Skills and Hearing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2018, Vol. 61, 2084-2098. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0278
History: Received July 20, 2017 , Revised December 19, 2017 , Accepted March 23, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2018, Vol. 61, 2084-2098. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0278
History: Received July 20, 2017; Revised December 19, 2017; Accepted March 23, 2018

Purpose The study compared how parents of children with cochlear implants (CIs) and parents of children with normal hearing perceive their children's health-related quality of life (HR-QOL).

Method The sample consisted of 186 Norwegian-speaking children in the age span of 5;0–12;11 (years;months): 106 children with CIs (53% boys, 47% girls) and 80 children with normal hearing (44% boys, 56% girls). No children had known additional disabilities affecting language, cognitive development, or HR-QOL. Parents completed the generic questionnaire Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (Varni, Seid, & Kurtin, 2001), whereas children completed a test battery measuring different aspects of language and hearing.

Results Parents of children with CIs reported statistically significantly poorer HR-QOL in their children, on Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory total score and the subdomains social functioning and school functioning. Roughly 50% of parents of children with CIs reported HR-QOL levels (total score) within normal limits. No significant differences between groups emerged on the physical health and emotional functioning subscales. For the children in the group with CIs, better speech perception in everyday situations was associated with higher proxy-ratings of HR-QOL. Better spoken language skills were weakly to moderately associated with higher HR-QOL.

Conclusions The findings suggest that the social and school situation is not yet resolved satisfactorily for children with CIs. Habilitation focusing on spoken language skills and better sound environment may improve social interactions with peers and overall school functioning.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the Norwegian Directorate of Health, Oslo University Hospital, and the University of Oslo. We wish to thank all the children and parents who participated in our study. We also want to thank the CI-team at Oslo University Hospital and the people who helped collecting the data for the study: Marit Enny Gismarvik, Åsrun Valberg, and Ellen Brinchmann.
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