Immature Auditory Evoked Potentials in Children With Moderate–Severe Developmental Language Disorder Purpose Immature auditory processing has been proposed to underlie language impairments in children with developmental language disorder (DLD; also known as specific language impairment). Using newly available normative auditory evoked potential (AEP) waveforms, we estimated AEP maturity in individual children with DLD and explored whether this maturational index was related ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 13, 2018
Immature Auditory Evoked Potentials in Children With Moderate–Severe Developmental Language Disorder
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elaine Y. L. Kwok
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
    Graduate Program in Health & Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  • Marc F. Joanisse
    Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
    The Brain and Mind Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  • Lisa M. D. Archibald
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
    Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  • Janis Oram Cardy
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
    Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Janis Oram Cardy: janis.cardy@uwo.ca
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Jan de Jong
    Editor: Jan de Jong×
Article Information
Development / Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 13, 2018
Immature Auditory Evoked Potentials in Children With Moderate–Severe Developmental Language Disorder
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, July 2018, Vol. 61, 1718-1730. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0420
History: Received November 9, 2017 , Revised March 20, 2018 , Accepted April 4, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, July 2018, Vol. 61, 1718-1730. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0420
History: Received November 9, 2017; Revised March 20, 2018; Accepted April 4, 2018

Purpose Immature auditory processing has been proposed to underlie language impairments in children with developmental language disorder (DLD; also known as specific language impairment). Using newly available normative auditory evoked potential (AEP) waveforms, we estimated AEP maturity in individual children with DLD and explored whether this maturational index was related to their language abilities.

Method AEPs were elicited by 225 trials of a 490-Hz pure tone. Using intraclass correlation and our previously established normative AEP waveforms of 7- to 10-year-old children with typical development, we estimated the age equivalent of the AEPs (AEP–age) from 21 children with DLD. The relation between AEP maturity and language was explored through regression analysis.

Results AEP–age predicted 31% of the variance in the language abilities of children with DLD. The AEP–age of children with mild DLD was similar to their chronological age, whereas children with moderate–severe DLD showed, on average, a 1.3-year delay in their neural responses. AEP–age predicted receptive, but not expressive, language performance.

Conclusion Maturation in auditory neural responses is a significant predictor of language ability, particularly in children with moderate–severe DLD.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Discovery Grant 418406-2012 to Janis Oram Cardy and 371201-2009 to Lisa M. D. Archibald and a Scottish Rite Charitable Foundation of Canada Research Grant to Janis Oram Cardy. The authors thank the children and parents for their participation and Margot Stothers, Heather Brown, Rachael Smyth, Jillian Spratt, Jessica Boehm, Charity McCarthy, Jackson Wilson, Asha Shelton, and Katherine Harder for their assistance with data collection.
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