Teleaudiology Services for Rehabilitation With Hearing Aids in Adults: A Systematic Review Purpose This review examined (a) the current evidence from studies on teleaudiology applications for rehabilitation of adults with hearing impairment with hearing aids and (b) whether it is sufficient to support the translation into routine clinical practice. Method A search strategy and eligibility criteria were utilized to include ... Review Article
Review Article  |   July 13, 2018
Teleaudiology Services for Rehabilitation With Hearing Aids in Adults: A Systematic Review
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karina F. M. Tao
    Ear Sciences Centre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA
    Ear Science Institute Australia, Nedlands, WA
    CAPES Foundation, Ministry of Education of Brazil, Brasilia, DF
  • Christopher G. Brennan-Jones
    Ear Sciences Centre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA
    Ear Science Institute Australia, Nedlands, WA
    Telethon Kids Institute, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia
  • Dirce M. Capobianco-Fava
    Department of Emergency Medicine and Evidence-Based Medicine, Paulista School of Medicine, Universidade Federal de São Paulo [Federal University of Sao Paulo], Brazil
    HiTalk Comunicação & Consultoria Ltda, Sao Paulo, Brazil
  • Dona M. P. Jayakody
    Ear Sciences Centre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA
    Ear Science Institute Australia, Nedlands, WA
  • Peter L. Friedland
    Ear Sciences Centre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA
    Ear Science Institute Australia, Nedlands, WA
    Department of Otolaryngology Head & Neck Skull Base Surgery, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia
    School of Medicine, The University of Notre Dame, Fremantle, WA, Australia
  • De Wet Swanepoel
    Ear Sciences Centre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA
    Ear Science Institute Australia, Nedlands, WA
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa
  • Robert H. Eikelboom
    Ear Sciences Centre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA
    Ear Science Institute Australia, Nedlands, WA
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, University of Pretoria, South Africa
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Karina F. M. Tao: karina.tao@earscience.org.au
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Editor: Todd Ricketts
    Editor: Todd Ricketts×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Hearing / Review Article
Review Article   |   July 13, 2018
Teleaudiology Services for Rehabilitation With Hearing Aids in Adults: A Systematic Review
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, July 2018, Vol. 61, 1831-1849. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-16-0397
History: Received October 17, 2016 , Revised August 30, 2017 , Accepted February 16, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, July 2018, Vol. 61, 1831-1849. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-16-0397
History: Received October 17, 2016; Revised August 30, 2017; Accepted February 16, 2018

Purpose This review examined (a) the current evidence from studies on teleaudiology applications for rehabilitation of adults with hearing impairment with hearing aids and (b) whether it is sufficient to support the translation into routine clinical practice.

Method A search strategy and eligibility criteria were utilized to include articles specifically related to hearing aid fitting and follow-up procedures that are involved in consultations for the rehabilitation of adults, where the service was provided by the clinician by teleaudiology. A search using key words and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) was conducted on the main electronic databases that index health-related studies. The included studies were assessed using validated evaluation tools for methodological quality, level of evidence, and grade recommendations for application into practice.

Results Fourteen studies were identified as being within the scope of this review. The evaluation tools showed that none of these studies demonstrated either a strong methodological quality or high level of evidence. Analysis of evidence identified 19 activities, which were classified into service outcomes categories of feasibility, barriers, efficiency, quality, and effectiveness. Recommendations could be made regarding the (a) feasibility, (b) barriers, and (c) efficiency of teleaudiology for the rehabilitation of hearing loss with hearing aids.

Conclusion This review provides up-to-date evidence for teleaudiology hearing aid services in new and experienced hearing aid users in different practice settings. Findings direct future research priorities to strengthen evidence-based practice. There is a need for further studies of many aspects of teleaudiology services for rehabilitation with hearing aids to support their implementation into clinical practice.

Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.6534473

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by CAPES Foundation, Process BEX 13410/13-0, Science Without Borders Program, Brazil (awarded to Karina F. M. Tao) and by Ear Science Institute Australia, Perth, Australia.
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