Receptive Language Skills in Slovak-Speaking Children With Intellectual Disability: Understanding Words, Sentences, and Stories Purpose The study aims to describe receptive language skills in children with intellectual disability (ID) and to contribute to the debate on deviant versus delayed language development. This is the 1st study of receptive skills in children with ID who speak a Slavic language, providing insight into how language development ... Research Note
Research Note  |   July 13, 2018
Receptive Language Skills in Slovak-Speaking Children With Intellectual Disability: Understanding Words, Sentences, and Stories
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kamila Polišenská
    Division of Human Communication, Development and Hearing, The University of Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Svetlana Kapalková
    Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
  • Monika Novotková
    Comenius University, Bratislava, Slovakia
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Kamila Polišenská: kamila.polisenska@manchester.ac.uk
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Margaret Kjelgaard
    Editor: Margaret Kjelgaard×
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Language / Research Note
Research Note   |   July 13, 2018
Receptive Language Skills in Slovak-Speaking Children With Intellectual Disability: Understanding Words, Sentences, and Stories
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, July 2018, Vol. 61, 1731-1742. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0029
History: Received January 23, 2017 , Revised May 30, 2017 , Accepted February 8, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, July 2018, Vol. 61, 1731-1742. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0029
History: Received January 23, 2017; Revised May 30, 2017; Accepted February 8, 2018

Purpose The study aims to describe receptive language skills in children with intellectual disability (ID) and to contribute to the debate on deviant versus delayed language development. This is the 1st study of receptive skills in children with ID who speak a Slavic language, providing insight into how language development is affected by disability and also language typology.

Method Twenty-eight Slovak-speaking children participated in the study (14 children with ID and 14 typically developing [TD] children matched on nonverbal reasoning abilities). The children were assessed by receptive language tasks targeting words, sentences, and stories, and the groups were compared quantitatively and qualitatively.

Results The groups showed similar language profiles, with a better understanding of words, followed by sentences, with the poorest comprehension for stories. Nouns were comprehended better than verbs; sentence constructions also showed a qualitatively similar picture, although some dissimilarities emerged. Verb comprehension was strongly related to sentence comprehension in both groups and related to story comprehension in the TD group only.

Conclusion The findings appear to support the view that receptive language skills follow the same developmental route in children with ID as seen in younger TD children, suggesting that language development is a robust process and does not seem to be differentially affected by ID even when delayed.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Grant APVV-0410-11 from the Slovak Research and Development Agency, awarded to Svetlana Kapalková and Lýdia Vencelová. The authors' thanks go to the children, parents, and teachers who contributed to the study. The authors would also like to thank J. D. Fenton at EdThis for editing.
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