Swallowing Kinematic Differences Across Frozen, Mixed, and Ultrathin Liquid Boluses in Healthy Adults: Age, Sex, and Normal Variability Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the effects of frozen and mixed-consistency boluses on the swallowing physiology of younger and older adults. We also aimed to quantify factors that lead to increased variability in swallowing outcomes (i.e., age, sex, bolus type). Method Forty-one healthy adults ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   May 23, 2018
Swallowing Kinematic Differences Across Frozen, Mixed, and Ultrathin Liquid Boluses in Healthy Adults: Age, Sex, and Normal Variability
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ianessa A. Humbert
    Swallowing Systems Core, Department of Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville
    Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville
    Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Kirstyn L. Sunday
    Swallowing Systems Core, Department of Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Eleni Karagiorgos
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Alicia K. Vose
    Department of Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville
    Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Francois Gould
    Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, North East Ohio Medical University, Akron
  • Lindsey Greene
    Swallowing Systems Core, Department of Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Alba Azola
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
  • Ara Tolar
    Swallowing Systems Core, Department of Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Alycia Rivet
    Swallowing Systems Core, Department of Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville
    Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Health and Health Professions, University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Ianessa A. Humbert: ihumbert@ufl.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
  • Editor: Michelle Ciucci
    Editor: Michelle Ciucci×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   May 23, 2018
Swallowing Kinematic Differences Across Frozen, Mixed, and Ultrathin Liquid Boluses in Healthy Adults: Age, Sex, and Normal Variability
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0417
History: Received November 8, 2017 , Revised January 15, 2018 , Accepted February 9, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0417
History: Received November 8, 2017; Revised January 15, 2018; Accepted February 9, 2018

Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the effects of frozen and mixed-consistency boluses on the swallowing physiology of younger and older adults. We also aimed to quantify factors that lead to increased variability in swallowing outcomes (i.e., age, sex, bolus type).

Method Forty-one healthy adults (18–85 years old) swallowed 5 blocks of 5 different boluses: 10-ml ultrathin liquid, a teaspoon of iced barium, a teaspoon of room-temperature pudding, a teaspoon of frozen pudding, and ultrathin barium with chocolate chips. All data were recorded with videofluoroscopy and underwent detailed timing kinematic measurements.

Results Neither barium ice nor frozen pudding sped up swallow responses. Many healthy adults initiated swallowing with the bolus as deep as the pyriform sinuses. Swallowing temporal kinematics for ultrathin liquid consistencies are most different from all others tested, requiring the best possible physiological swallowing performance in younger and older healthy individuals (i.e., faster reaction times, longer durations) compared with other bolus types tested. In each measure, older adults had significantly longer durations compared with the younger adults. More variability in swallowing kinematics were seen with age and laryngeal vestibule kinematics.

Conclusion This study provides important contributions to the literature by clarifying normal variability within a wide range of swallowing behaviors and by providing normative data from which to compare disordered populations.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health R01 DC014285 (PI: Humbert).
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