Loudness Perception of Pure Tones in Parkinson's Disease Purpose Reduced intensity is a hallmark of speech production in Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous work has examined the perception of intensity in PD to explain these speech deficits. This study reports loudness ratings of pure tones by individuals with PD and controls, all with normal thesholds for older adults. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 19, 2018
Loudness Perception of Pure Tones in Parkinson's Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Defne Abur
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Ashling A. Lupiani
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
  • Ann E. Hickox
    Decibel Therapeutics, Boston, MA
  • Barbara G. Shinn-Cunningham
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
  • Cara E. Stepp
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, MA
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, MA
    Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Defne Abur: defneabur@gmail.com
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Editor: Steve Aiken
    Editor: Steve Aiken×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 19, 2018
Loudness Perception of Pure Tones in Parkinson's Disease
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2018, Vol. 61, 1487-1496. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0382
History: Received October 9, 2017 , Revised January 13, 2018 , Accepted February 23, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2018, Vol. 61, 1487-1496. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0382
History: Received October 9, 2017; Revised January 13, 2018; Accepted February 23, 2018

Purpose Reduced intensity is a hallmark of speech production in Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous work has examined the perception of intensity in PD to explain these speech deficits. This study reports loudness ratings of pure tones by individuals with PD and controls, all with normal thesholds for older adults.

Method Twenty individuals with PD and 23 age- and sex-matched controls rated the loudness of pure tones from 1 (very soft) to 7 (uncomfortably loud). Tones at 500, 750, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz were presented from 35 to 80 dB HL (or until a rating of 7 was given). A mixed-model analysis of variance was performed on ratings to assess the effects of group, frequency, sound intensity, and ear. Loudness growth slopes were determined for each participant and analyzed by group.

Results The mean loudness growth slopes of the control and PD groups did not significantly differ.

Conclusions No difference was found in loudness growth slopes in response to externally generated tones in PD. This is in contrast with the findings of previous studies of self-generated speech and externally presented speech. The underlying causes for impaired perception and production of loudness in PD require further investigation.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Grant DC015570 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) to Cara E. Stepp and a pilot grant to Cara E. Stepp from the Boston Rehabilitation Outcomes Center, supported by Grant HD065688 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to Alan Jette. The authors would like to thank Rosemary Lester-Smith for assistance with data collection and Tyler Baxter and Julia Donovan for their help with participant recruitment.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access