Predicting Remembering: Judgments of Prospective Memory After Traumatic Brain Injury Purpose Adults with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) often struggle with prospective memory (PM), the ability to remember to complete tasks in the future, such as taking medicines on a schedule. Metamemory judgments (or how well we think we will do at remembering) are linked to strategy use and are critical ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 19, 2018
Predicting Remembering: Judgments of Prospective Memory After Traumatic Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katy H. O'Brien
    Communication Sciences and Special Education, University of Georgia, Athens
  • Mary R. T. Kennedy
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, Chapman University, Irvine, CA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Katy H. O'Brien: khobrien@uga.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Lyn Turkstra
    Editor: Lyn Turkstra×
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 19, 2018
Predicting Remembering: Judgments of Prospective Memory After Traumatic Brain Injury
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2018, Vol. 61, 1393-1408. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0226
History: Received June 9, 2017 , Revised November 30, 2017 , Accepted February 2, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2018, Vol. 61, 1393-1408. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0226
History: Received June 9, 2017; Revised November 30, 2017; Accepted February 2, 2018

Purpose Adults with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) often struggle with prospective memory (PM), the ability to remember to complete tasks in the future, such as taking medicines on a schedule. Metamemory judgments (or how well we think we will do at remembering) are linked to strategy use and are critical for managing demands of daily living. The current project used an Internet-based virtual reality tool to assess metamemory judgments of PM following TBI.

Method Eighteen adults with moderate to severe TBI and 20 healthy controls (HCs) played Tying the String, a virtual reality game with PM items embedded across the course of a virtual work week. Participants studied PM items and made two judgments of learning about the likelihood of recognizing the CUE, that is, when the task should be done, and of recalling the TASK, that is, what needed to be done.

Results Participants with TBI adjusted their metamemory expectations downward, but not enough to account for poorer recall performance. Absolute difference scores of metamemory accuracy showed that healthy adults were underconfident across PM components, whereas adults with TBI were markedly overconfident about their ability to recall TASKs.

Conclusions Adults with TBI appear to have a general knowledge that PM tasks will be difficult but are poor monitors of actual levels of success. Because metamemory monitoring is linked to strategy use, future work should examine using this link to direct PM intervention approaches.

Acknowledgments
Funding for this research study was supported by the Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences at the University of Minnesota, the Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship at the University of Minnesota, and the New Century Doctoral Scholarship through the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, all awarded to Katy O'Brien. The authors thank Jacqueline Brown, Kimberly Dable, and Lauren Beck Stutzman for their assistance with this project.
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