Predicting Receptive–Expressive Vocabulary Discrepancies in Preschool Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder Purpose Correlates of receptive–expressive vocabulary size discrepancies may provide insights into why language development in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) deviates from typical language development and ultimately improve intervention outcomes. Method We indexed receptive–expressive vocabulary size discrepancies of 65 initially preverbal children with ASD (20–48 months) to ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   May 15, 2018
Predicting Receptive–Expressive Vocabulary Discrepancies in Preschool Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jena McDaniel
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Paul Yoder
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN
  • Tiffany Woynaroski
    Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN
  • Linda R. Watson
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jena McDaniel: jena.c.mcdaniel@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Magaret Kjelgaard
    Editor: Magaret Kjelgaard×
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   May 15, 2018
Predicting Receptive–Expressive Vocabulary Discrepancies in Preschool Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0101
History: Received March 17, 2017 , Revised August 1, 2017 , Accepted February 8, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0101
History: Received March 17, 2017; Revised August 1, 2017; Accepted February 8, 2018

Purpose Correlates of receptive–expressive vocabulary size discrepancies may provide insights into why language development in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) deviates from typical language development and ultimately improve intervention outcomes.

Method We indexed receptive–expressive vocabulary size discrepancies of 65 initially preverbal children with ASD (20–48 months) to a comparison sample from the MacArthur–Bates Communicative Development Inventories Wordbank (Frank, Braginsky, Yurovsky, & Marchman, 2017) to quantify typicality. We then tested whether attention toward a speaker and oral motor performance predict typicality of the discrepancy 8 months later.

Results Attention toward a speaker correlated positively with receptive–expressive vocabulary size discrepancy typicality. Imitative and nonimitative oral motor performance were not significant predictors of vocabulary size discrepancy typicality. Secondary analyses indicated that midpoint receptive vocabulary size mediated the association between initial attention toward a speaker and end point receptive–expressive vocabulary size discrepancy typicality.

Conclusions Findings support the hypothesis that variation in attention toward a speaker might partially explain receptive–expressive vocabulary size discrepancy magnitude in children with ASD. Results are consistent with an input-processing deficit explanation of language impairment in this clinical population. Future studies should test whether attention toward a speaker is malleable and causally related to receptive–expressive discrepancies in children with ASD.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by a grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (R01DC006893; Vanderbilt University) and further supported by a U.S. Department of Education Preparation of Leadership Personnel grant (H325D140087; Vanderbilt University), the EKS of NIH (U54HD083211; Vanderbilt University), the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (KL2TR000446; Vanderbilt University), and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (P30HD03110; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill). We are grateful to the families who trust us with their precious children.
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