Infant–Mother Acoustic–Prosodic Alignment and Developmental Risk Purpose One promising early marker for autism and other communicative and language disorders is early infant speech production. Here we used daylong recordings of high- and low-risk infant–mother dyads to examine whether acoustic–prosodic alignment as well as two automated measures of infant vocalization are related to developmental risk status indexed ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 19, 2018
Infant–Mother Acoustic–Prosodic Alignment and Developmental Risk
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amanda Seidl
    Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Alejandrina Cristia
    LSCP, Département d'études cognitives, ENS, EHESS, CNRS, PSL Research University, Paris, France
  • Melanie Soderstrom
    University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
  • Eon-Suk Ko
    Chosun University, Gwangju, South Korea
  • Emily A. Abel
    Human Development and Family Studies, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Ashleigh Kellerman
    Human Development and Family Studies, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • A. J. Schwichtenberg
    Human Development and Family Studies, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Amanda Seidl: aseidl@purdue.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
  • Editor: Stephanie Borrie
    Editor: Stephanie Borrie×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 19, 2018
Infant–Mother Acoustic–Prosodic Alignment and Developmental Risk
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2018, Vol. 61, 1369-1380. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0287
History: Received July 29, 2017 , Revised November 17, 2017 , Accepted February 12, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2018, Vol. 61, 1369-1380. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-S-17-0287
History: Received July 29, 2017; Revised November 17, 2017; Accepted February 12, 2018

Purpose One promising early marker for autism and other communicative and language disorders is early infant speech production. Here we used daylong recordings of high- and low-risk infant–mother dyads to examine whether acoustic–prosodic alignment as well as two automated measures of infant vocalization are related to developmental risk status indexed via familial risk and developmental progress at 36 months of age.

Method Automated analyses of the acoustics of daylong real-world interactions were used to examine whether pitch characteristics of one vocalization by the mother or the child predicted those of the vocalization response by the other speaker and whether other features of infants' speech in daylong recordings were associated with developmental risk status or outcomes.

Results Low-risk and high-risk dyads did not differ in the level of acoustic–prosodic alignment, which was overall not significant. Further analyses revealed that acoustic–prosodic alignment did not predict infants' later developmental progress, which was, however, associated with two automated measures of infant vocalizations (daily vocalizations and conversational turns).

Conclusions Although further research is needed, these findings suggest that automated measures of vocalizations drawn from daylong recordings are a possible early identification tool for later developmental progress/concerns.

Supplemental Material https://osf.io/cdn3v/

Acknowledgments
A. Cristia acknowledges the institutional support of ANR-10-IDEX-0001-02 PSL*, ANR-10-LABX-0087 IEC and the financial support of ANR-14-CE30-0003 MechELex. Also, A. Seidl would like to thank Purdue University for the Study in a Second Discipline Grant, which allowed for the completion of this work. We are grateful to all the families who opened their homes, shared their lives, and allowed us to watch their little ones grow—thank you. We also acknowledge and thank the senior mentors who supported the design and success of the larger study (for which this study was a supplement). Thank you, Sally Ozonoff and Thomas F. Anders.
Contributions: AS and AJS designed the primary research question, AJS oversaw the data collection, AC and AS performed the data analyses and interpretation, AS wrote the first draft, all authors provided input in critical revisions and approved the final version.
Compliance With Ethical Standards: This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health R00MH092431 (PI: Schwichtenberg).
Ethical Approval: All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.
Informed Consent: Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.
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