Does Implicit Voice Learning Improve Spoken Language Processing? Implications for Clinical Practice Purpose In typical interactions with other speakers, including a clinical environment, listeners become familiar with voices through implicit learning. Previous studies have found evidence for a Familiar Talker Advantage (better speech perception and spoken language processing for familiar voices) following explicit voice learning. The current study examined whether a Familiar ... Research Note
Research Note  |   May 17, 2018
Does Implicit Voice Learning Improve Spoken Language Processing? Implications for Clinical Practice
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie Case
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University, New York
  • Scott Seyfarth
    Department of Linguistics and Office of Academic Affairs, Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Susannah V. Levi
    Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders, New York University, New York
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Julie Case: julie.case@nyu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Lizbeth Finestack
    Editor: Lizbeth Finestack×
Article Information
Development / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Notes
Research Note   |   May 17, 2018
Does Implicit Voice Learning Improve Spoken Language Processing? Implications for Clinical Practice
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2018, Vol. 61, 1251-1260. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0298
History: Received August 10, 2017 , Revised December 2, 2017 , Accepted January 19, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2018, Vol. 61, 1251-1260. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-17-0298
History: Received August 10, 2017; Revised December 2, 2017; Accepted January 19, 2018

Purpose In typical interactions with other speakers, including a clinical environment, listeners become familiar with voices through implicit learning. Previous studies have found evidence for a Familiar Talker Advantage (better speech perception and spoken language processing for familiar voices) following explicit voice learning. The current study examined whether a Familiar Talker Advantage would result from implicit voice learning.

Method Thirty-three adults and 16 second graders were familiarized with 1 of 2 talkers' voices over 2 days through live interactions as 1 of 2 experimenters administered standardized tests and interacted with the listeners. To assess whether this implicit voice learning would generate a Familiar Talker Advantage, listeners completed a baseline sentence recognition task and a post-learning sentence recognition task with both the familiar talker and the unfamiliar talker.

Results No significant effect of voice familiarity was found for either the children or the adults following implicit voice learning. Effect size estimates suggest that familiarity with the voice may benefit some listeners, despite the lack of an overall effect of familiarity.

Discussion We discuss possible clinical implications of this finding and directions for future research.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by a grant from the NIH-NIDCD: 1R03DC009851-01 (Levi). We would like to thank Gabrielle Alfano, Stephanie Lee, Maddy Lippman, Rebecca Piper, and Ashley Quinto for help with data collection and the children and families for their participation. Portions of this work were presented at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2016) and at the Symposium on Research in Child Language Disorders (2017).
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