The Prevalence of Speech and Language Disorders in French-Speaking Preschool Children From Yaoundé (Cameroon) Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of speech and language disorders in French-speaking preschool-age children in Yaoundé, the capital city of Cameroon. Method A total of 460 participants aged 3–5 years were recruited from the 7 communes of Yaoundé using a 2-stage cluster ... Research Note
Research Note  |   May 17, 2018
The Prevalence of Speech and Language Disorders in French-Speaking Preschool Children From Yaoundé (Cameroon)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lilly Tchoungui Oyono
    Division of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa
  • Michelle Pascoe
    Division of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa
  • Shajila Singh
    Division of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Department of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Cape Town, South Africa
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Lilly Tchoungui Oyono: lillyto@hotmail.com
  • Editor: Sean Redmond
    Editor: Sean Redmond×
  • Associate Editor: Jan de Jong
    Associate Editor: Jan de Jong×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / International & Global / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Notes
Research Note   |   May 17, 2018
The Prevalence of Speech and Language Disorders in French-Speaking Preschool Children From Yaoundé (Cameroon)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2018, Vol. 61, 1238-1250. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-16-0400
History: Received October 13, 2016 , Revised April 29, 2017 , Accepted January 11, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2018, Vol. 61, 1238-1250. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-16-0400
History: Received October 13, 2016; Revised April 29, 2017; Accepted January 11, 2018

Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of speech and language disorders in French-speaking preschool-age children in Yaoundé, the capital city of Cameroon.

Method A total of 460 participants aged 3–5 years were recruited from the 7 communes of Yaoundé using a 2-stage cluster sampling method. Speech and language assessment was undertaken using a standardized speech and language test, the Evaluation du Langage Oral (Khomsi, 2001), which was purposefully renormed on the sample. A predetermined cutoff of 2 SDs below the normative mean was applied to identify articulation, expressive language, and receptive language disorders. Fluency and voice disorders were identified using clinical judgment by a speech-language pathologist.

Results Overall prevalence was calculated as follows: speech disorders, 14.7%; language disorders, 4.3%; and speech and language disorders, 17.1%. In terms of disorders, prevalence findings were as follows: articulation disorders, 3.6%; expressive language disorders, 1.3%; receptive language disorders, 3%; fluency disorders, 8.4%; and voice disorders, 3.6%.

Conclusion Prevalence figures are higher than those reported for other countries and emphasize the urgent need to develop speech and language services for the Cameroonian population.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the Faculty Research Committee Awards: Postgraduate Publication Incentive from the University of Cape Town, awarded to Lilly Tchoungui Oyono. The authors extend their deepest gratitude to (a) the learners and their parents for their voluntary participation; (b) the authorities of the Ministry of Basic Education in Cameroon, the principals, teachers, and the staff at the schools in Yaoundé for their collaboration; (c) the research assistant, Diane Boukem, for her support with the data collection; (d) Andre Pascal Kengne for his valuable expertise for statistical analysis and interpretation of the data; and (e) Claire Nkoue, speech-language pathologist in Yaoundé, for her assistance with the reliability test.
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