A Systematic Review of Semantic Feature Analysis Therapy Studies for Aphasia Purpose The purpose of this study was to review treatment studies of semantic feature analysis (SFA) for persons with aphasia. The review documents how SFA is used, appraises the quality of the included studies, and evaluates the efficacy of SFA. Method The following electronic databases were systematically searched ... Review Article
Review Article  |   May 17, 2018
A Systematic Review of Semantic Feature Analysis Therapy Studies for Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Evangelia Antonia Efstratiadou
    Division of Language & Communication Science, City, University of London, United Kingdom
    Thales Aphasia Project, Department of Linguistics, School of Philosophy, University of Athens, Greece
  • Ilias Papathanasiou
    Thales Aphasia Project, Department of Linguistics, School of Philosophy, University of Athens, Greece
    Department of Speech and Language Therapy, TEI of Western Greece, Patra
  • Rachel Holland
    Division of Language & Communication Science, City, University of London, United Kingdom
  • Anastasia Archonti
    Thales Aphasia Project, Department of Linguistics, School of Philosophy, University of Athens, Greece
  • Katerina Hilari
    Division of Language & Communication Science, City, University of London, United Kingdom
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Katerina Hilari: k.hilari@city.ac.uk
  • Editor: Sean Redmond
    Editor: Sean Redmond×
  • Associate Editor: Swathi Kiran
    Associate Editor: Swathi Kiran×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Review Articles
Review Article   |   May 17, 2018
A Systematic Review of Semantic Feature Analysis Therapy Studies for Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2018, Vol. 61, 1261-1278. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-16-0330
History: Received August 13, 2016 , Revised March 1, 2017 , Accepted December 22, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, May 2018, Vol. 61, 1261-1278. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-L-16-0330
History: Received August 13, 2016; Revised March 1, 2017; Accepted December 22, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this study was to review treatment studies of semantic feature analysis (SFA) for persons with aphasia. The review documents how SFA is used, appraises the quality of the included studies, and evaluates the efficacy of SFA.

Method The following electronic databases were systematically searched (last search February 2017): Academic Search Complete, CINAHL Plus, E-journals, Health Policy Reference Centre, MEDLINE, PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, and SocINDEX. The quality of the included studies was rated. Clinical efficacy was determined by calculating effect sizes (Cohen's d) or percent of nonoverlapping data when d could not be calculated.

Results Twenty-one studies were reviewed reporting on 55 persons with aphasia. SFA was used in 6 different types of studies: confrontation naming of nouns, confrontation naming of verbs, connected speech/discourse, group, multilingual, and studies where SFA was compared with other approaches. The quality of included studies was high (Single Case Experimental Design Scale average [range] = 9.55 [8.0–11]). Naming of trained items improved for 45 participants (81.82%). Effect sizes indicated that there was a small treatment effect.

Conclusions SFA leads to positive outcomes despite the variability of treatment procedures, dosage, duration, and variations to the traditional SFA protocol. Further research is warranted to examine the efficacy of SFA and generalization effects in larger controlled studies.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a doctoral studentship to the first author by the School of Health Sciences, City, University of London.
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