Fatigue Related to Speech Processing in Children With Hearing Loss: Behavioral, Subjective, and Electrophysiological Measures Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine fatigue associated with sustained and effortful speech-processing in children with mild to moderately severe hearing loss. Method We used auditory P300 responses, subjective reports, and behavioral indices (response time, lapses of attention) to measure fatigue resulting from sustained speech-processing ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 17, 2018
Fatigue Related to Speech Processing in Children With Hearing Loss: Behavioral, Subjective, and Electrophysiological Measures
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Samantha J. Gustafson
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Nashville, TN
  • Alexandra P. Key
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Nashville, TN
    Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Benjamin W. Y. Hornsby
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Nashville, TN
  • Fred H. Bess
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Nashville, TN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Samantha Gustafson is now at the Department of Otolaryngology at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
    Samantha Gustafson is now at the Department of Otolaryngology at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.×
  • Correspondence to Samantha Gustafson: Samantha_gustafson@med.unc.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Editor: Steve Aiken
    Editor: Steve Aiken×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 17, 2018
Fatigue Related to Speech Processing in Children With Hearing Loss: Behavioral, Subjective, and Electrophysiological Measures
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2018, Vol. 61, 1000-1011. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0314
History: Received August 19, 2017 , Revised December 5, 2017 , Accepted January 4, 2018
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2018, Vol. 61, 1000-1011. doi:10.1044/2018_JSLHR-H-17-0314
History: Received August 19, 2017; Revised December 5, 2017; Accepted January 4, 2018

Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine fatigue associated with sustained and effortful speech-processing in children with mild to moderately severe hearing loss.

Method We used auditory P300 responses, subjective reports, and behavioral indices (response time, lapses of attention) to measure fatigue resulting from sustained speech-processing demands in 34 children with mild to moderately severe hearing loss (M = 10.03 years, SD = 1.93).

Results Compared to baseline values, children with hearing loss showed increased lapses in attention, longer reaction times, reduced P300 amplitudes, and greater reports of fatigue following the completion of the demanding speech-processing tasks.

Conclusions Similar to children with normal hearing, children with hearing loss demonstrate reductions in attentional processing of speech in noise following sustained speech-processing tasks—a finding consistent with the development of fatigue.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported in part by IES Grant R324A110266 to Vanderbilt University (Fred Bess, principal investigator) and NICHD Grants P30 HD15052 and U54HD083211 to Vanderbilt Kennedy Center. This research was also supported by the Dan and Margaret Maddox Charitable Fund. The content expressed is that of the authors and do not necessarily represent official views of the Institute of Educational Sciences, the U.S. Department of Education, or the National Institutes of Health. Data management was supported in part by the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (UL1 TR000445 from NCATS/NIH to Vanderbilt University Medical Center). We would like to thank Dorita Jones for assistance with AEP data processing as well as students and study staff who assisted in participant recruitment and data collection.
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