Comparison of Subjective and Objective Measures of Hearing, Auditory Processing, and Cognition Among Older Adults With and Without Mild Cognitive Impairment Purpose The aims of the study were to compare the Cognitive Self-Report Questionnaire (CSRQ; Spina, Ruff, & Mahncke, 2006) Hearing and Cognitive subscale ratings among older adults with and without probable mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and to examine whether self-report, as measured by the CSRQ, is associated with objective measures ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 17, 2018
Comparison of Subjective and Objective Measures of Hearing, Auditory Processing, and Cognition Among Older Adults With and Without Mild Cognitive Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bernadette A. Fausto
    School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Adrian N. S. Badana
    School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Michelle L. Arnold
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Jennifer J. Lister
    Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Jerri D. Edwards
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Bernadette A. Fausto: bfausto@usf.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Editor: Steve Aiken
    Editor: Steve Aiken×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 17, 2018
Comparison of Subjective and Objective Measures of Hearing, Auditory Processing, and Cognition Among Older Adults With and Without Mild Cognitive Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2018, Vol. 61, 945-956. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0263
History: Received July 11, 2017 , Revised November 21, 2017 , Accepted December 1, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2018, Vol. 61, 945-956. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0263
History: Received July 11, 2017; Revised November 21, 2017; Accepted December 1, 2017

Purpose The aims of the study were to compare the Cognitive Self-Report Questionnaire (CSRQ; Spina, Ruff, & Mahncke, 2006) Hearing and Cognitive subscale ratings among older adults with and without probable mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and to examine whether self-report, as measured by the CSRQ, is associated with objective measures of hearing, auditory processing, and cognition.

Method Data analyses included 97 older adults of ages 61–91 years. Participants completed the CSRQ self-report measure as well as a battery of objective measures, including pure-tone audiometry, degraded speech understanding, temporal processing, and memory.

Results Older adults with probable MCI rated their cognitive abilities more poorly than those without MCI (p = .002), but ratings of hearing and auditory abilities did not differ between the two groups (p = .912). Age and CSRQ Hearing subscale ratings explained a significant proportion of variance in objective measures of hearing and degraded speech understanding (R 2 = .39, p < .001). Age, sex, mental status, and CSRQ Cognition subscale ratings explained a significant proportion of variance in objective memory performance (R 2 = .55, p < .001).

Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that the CSRQ is an appropriate self-report measure of hearing, cognition, and some aspects of auditory processing for older adults with and without probable MCI.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to acknowledge the investigators and research teams in the Cognitive and the Neurophysiology of Aging Labs at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida.
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