The Influence of Misarticulations on Children's Word Identification and Processing Purpose The purpose of the present studies was to determine how children's identification and processing of misarticulated words was influenced by substitution commonness. Method Sixty-one typically developing preschoolers across 3 experiments heard accurate productions of words (e.g., “leaf”), words containing common substitutions (e.g., “weaf”), and words containing uncommon ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 17, 2018
The Influence of Misarticulations on Children's Word Identification and Processing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Breanna I. Krueger
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Holly L. Storkel
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Utako Minai
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Breanna I. Krueger: bkrueger@uwyo.edu
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Maria Grigos
    Associate Editor: Maria Grigos×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 17, 2018
The Influence of Misarticulations on Children's Word Identification and Processing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2018, Vol. 61, 820-836. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0379
History: Received September 26, 2016 , Revised April 9, 2017 , Accepted November 21, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2018, Vol. 61, 820-836. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0379
History: Received September 26, 2016; Revised April 9, 2017; Accepted November 21, 2017

Purpose The purpose of the present studies was to determine how children's identification and processing of misarticulated words was influenced by substitution commonness.

Method Sixty-one typically developing preschoolers across 3 experiments heard accurate productions of words (e.g., “leaf”), words containing common substitutions (e.g., “weaf”), and words containing uncommon substitutions (e.g., “yeaf”). On each trial, preschoolers chose between a real object picture (e.g., a leaf) and a nonobject (e.g., an anomalous line drawing). Accuracy and processing were measured using MouseTracker and eye tracking.

Results Overall, children chose real objects significantly more when presented with accurate productions (e.g., “leaf”) than misarticulated productions (e.g., “weaf” or “yeaf”). Within misarticulation conditions, children chose real objects significantly more when hearing common misarticulations (e.g., “weaf”) than uncommon misarticulations (e.g., “yeaf”). Preschoolers identified words significantly faster and with greater certainty in accurate conditions than misarticulated conditions.

Conclusions The results of the present studies indicate that the commonness of substitutions influences children's identification of misarticulated words. Children hear common substitutions more frequently and therefore were supported in their identification of these words as real objects. The presence of substitutions, however, slowed reaction time when compared with accurate productions.

Supplemental Material https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5965510

Acknowledgments
The first author was a doctoral trainee whose research was funded by a National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders training grant, #5 T32 DC000052-17. We would like to express our gratitude to the families who participated in this research, to the cooperating preschool sites, and to our research team.
This research was conducted at the University of Kansas, as part of the requirements for the master's degree of the first author.
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