Clinical Strategies for Sampling Word Recognition Performance Purpose Computer simulation was used to estimate the statistical properties of searches for maximum word recognition ability (PB max). These involve presenting multiple lists and discarding all scores but that of the 1 list that produced the highest score. The simulations, which model limitations inherent in the precision of word ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 17, 2018
Clinical Strategies for Sampling Word Recognition Performance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert S. Schlauch
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Edward Carney
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Robert S. Schlauch: schla001@umn.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick Gallun×
  • Editor: Steve Aiken
    Editor: Steve Aiken×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Balance & Balance Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 17, 2018
Clinical Strategies for Sampling Word Recognition Performance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2018, Vol. 61, 936-944. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0236
History: Received June 19, 2017 , Revised November 3, 2017 , Accepted December 1, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2018, Vol. 61, 936-944. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0236
History: Received June 19, 2017; Revised November 3, 2017; Accepted December 1, 2017

Purpose Computer simulation was used to estimate the statistical properties of searches for maximum word recognition ability (PB max). These involve presenting multiple lists and discarding all scores but that of the 1 list that produced the highest score. The simulations, which model limitations inherent in the precision of word recognition scores, were done to inform clinical protocols. A secondary consideration was a derivation of 95% confidence intervals for significant changes in score from phonemic scoring of a 50-word list.

Method The PB max simulations were conducted on a “client” with flat performance intensity functions. The client's performance was assumed to be 60% initially and 40% for a second assessment. Thousands of estimates were obtained to examine the precision of (a) single lists and (b) multiple lists using a PB max procedure. This method permitted summarizing the precision for assessing a 20% drop in performance.

Results A single 25-word list could identify only 58.4% of the cases in which performance fell from 60% to 40%. A single 125-word list identified 99.8% of the declines correctly. Presenting 3 or 5 lists to find PB max produced an undesirable finding: an increase in the word recognition score.

Conclusions A 25-word list produces unacceptably low precision for making clinical decisions. This finding holds in both single and multiple 25-word lists, as in a search for PB max. A table is provided, giving estimates of 95% critical ranges for successive presentations of a 50-word list analyzed by the number of phonemes correctly identified.

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