Masked Repetition Priming Treatment for Anomia Purpose Masked priming has been suggested as a way to directly target implicit lexical retrieval processes in aphasia. This study was designed to investigate repeated use of masked repetition priming to improve picture naming in individuals with anomia due to aphasia. Method A single-subject, multiple-baseline design was used ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 15, 2018
Masked Repetition Priming Treatment for Anomia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • JoAnn P. Silkes
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to JoAnn P. Silkes: jsilkes@uw.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Charles Ellis
    Editor: Charles Ellis×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 15, 2018
Masked Repetition Priming Treatment for Anomia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2018, Vol. 61, 690-712. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0192
History: Received May 20, 2017 , Revised October 3, 2017 , Accepted November 25, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2018, Vol. 61, 690-712. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0192
History: Received May 20, 2017; Revised October 3, 2017; Accepted November 25, 2017

Purpose Masked priming has been suggested as a way to directly target implicit lexical retrieval processes in aphasia. This study was designed to investigate repeated use of masked repetition priming to improve picture naming in individuals with anomia due to aphasia.

Method A single-subject, multiple-baseline design was used across 6 people with aphasia. Training involved repeated exposure to pictures that were paired with masked identity primes or sham primes. Two semantic categories were trained in series for each participant. Analyses assessed treatment effects, generalization within and across semantic categories, and effects on broader language skills, immediately and 3 months after treatment.

Results Four of the 6 participants improved in naming trained items immediately after treatment. Improvements were generally greater for items that were presented in training with masked identity primes than items that were presented repeatedly during training with masked sham primes. Generalization within and across semantic categories was limited. Generalization to broader language skills was inconsistent.

Conclusion Masked repetition priming may improve naming for some individuals with anomia due to aphasia. A number of methodological and theoretical insights into further development of this treatment approach are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 5 R03 DC012643-02 (awarded to JoAnn P. Silkes). Thanks to Sara Pack and Julie Cooke for assistance with stimulus development; to Tiana Quitugua, Stephanie Balunda, Nicole Jahng, and Lisa Sabado for assistance with data analysis; and to the present and former members of the University of Washington Aphasia Research Lab for ongoing support.
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