Dysarthria in Mandarin-Speaking Children With Cerebral Palsy: Speech Subsystem Profiles Purpose This study explored the speech characteristics of Mandarin-speaking children with cerebral palsy (CP) and typically developing (TD) children to determine (a) how children in the 2 groups may differ in their speech patterns and (b) the variables correlated with speech intelligibility for words and sentences. Method Data ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 15, 2018
Dysarthria in Mandarin-Speaking Children With Cerebral Palsy: Speech Subsystem Profiles
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Li-Mei Chen
    Department of Foreign Languages and Literature, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
  • Katherine C. Hustad
    Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Ray D. Kent
    Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison
  • Yu Ching Lin
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
    Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan, Taiwan
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Li-Mei Chen: leemay@mail.ncku.edu.tw
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 15, 2018
Dysarthria in Mandarin-Speaking Children With Cerebral Palsy: Speech Subsystem Profiles
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2018, Vol. 61, 525-548. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0065
History: Received February 15, 2017 , Revised July 5, 2017 , Accepted November 16, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2018, Vol. 61, 525-548. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0065
History: Received February 15, 2017; Revised July 5, 2017; Accepted November 16, 2017
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This study explored the speech characteristics of Mandarin-speaking children with cerebral palsy (CP) and typically developing (TD) children to determine (a) how children in the 2 groups may differ in their speech patterns and (b) the variables correlated with speech intelligibility for words and sentences.

Method Data from 6 children with CP and a clinical diagnosis of moderate dysarthria were compared with data from 9 TD children using a multiple speech subsystems approach. Acoustic and perceptual variables reflecting 3 speech subsystems (articulatory-phonetic, phonatory, and prosodic), and speech intelligibility, were measured based on speech samples obtained from the Test of Children's Speech Intelligibility in Mandarin (developed in the lab for the purpose of this research).

Results The CP and TD children differed in several aspects of speech subsystem function. Speech intelligibility scores in children with CP were influenced by all 3 speech subsystems, but articulatory-phonetic variables had the highest correlation with word intelligibility. All 3 subsystems influenced sentence intelligibility.

Conclusion Children with CP demonstrated deficits in speech intelligibility and articulation compared with TD children. Better speech sound articulation influenced higher word intelligibility, but did not benefit sentence intelligibility.

Acknowledgment
This investigation was supported by funds from the Taiwan Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST 104-2410-H-006-061), awarded to the first author. The contribution of the second author was supported by grant R01DC009411 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, National Institutes of Health, and the Waisman Center core grant (U54 HD090256) from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health. A special thank you is extended to the families of the children in this study for their support of this project.
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