Bilingualism and Procedural Learning in Typically Developing Children and Children With Language Impairment Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate whether dual language experience affects procedural learning ability in typically developing children and in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Method We examined procedural learning in monolingual and bilingual school-aged children (ages 8–12 years) with and without SLI. The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 15, 2018
Bilingualism and Procedural Learning in Typically Developing Children and Children With Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jisook Park
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pennsylvania State University
  • Carol A. Miller
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Pennsylvania State University
  • David A. Rosenbaum
    Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University
  • Teenu Sanjeevan
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Canada
  • Janet G. van Hell
    Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University
  • Daniel J. Weiss
    Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University
  • Elina Mainela-Arnold
    Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Canada
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Jisook Park, who is now at the Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Canada: jisook.park@utoronto.ca
  • Editor: Sean Redmond
    Editor: Sean Redmond×
  • Associate Editor: Jan de Jong
    Associate Editor: Jan de Jong×
  • David A. Rosenbaum is now also with the Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside. Teenu Sanjeevan is now with Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Canada. Elina Mainela-Arnold is now also with the Department of Speech and Language Pathology, University of Turku, Finland.
    David A. Rosenbaum is now also with the Department of Psychology, University of California, Riverside. Teenu Sanjeevan is now with Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, Canada. Elina Mainela-Arnold is now also with the Department of Speech and Language Pathology, University of Turku, Finland.×
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 15, 2018
Bilingualism and Procedural Learning in Typically Developing Children and Children With Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2018, Vol. 61, 634-644. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0409
History: Received October 27, 2016 , Revised June 5, 2017 , Accepted October 30, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2018, Vol. 61, 634-644. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0409
History: Received October 27, 2016; Revised June 5, 2017; Accepted October 30, 2017
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate whether dual language experience affects procedural learning ability in typically developing children and in children with specific language impairment (SLI).

Method We examined procedural learning in monolingual and bilingual school-aged children (ages 8–12 years) with and without SLI. The typically developing children (35 monolinguals, 24 bilinguals) and the children with SLI (17 monolinguals, 10 bilinguals) completed a serial reaction time task.

Results The typically developing monolinguals and bilinguals exhibited equivalent sequential learning effects, but neither group with SLI exhibited learning of sequential patterns on the serial reaction time task.

Conclusion Procedural learning does not appear to be modified by language experience, supporting the notion that it is a child-intrinsic language learning mechanism that is minimally malleable to experience.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the University of Toronto Connaught Fund and Penn State Social Science Research Institute to Elina Mainela-Arnold and Carol A. Miller P.Is., respectively. The authors thank Asmait Abraha, Serena Appalsamy, Nicole Lynn Berkoski, Kaitlyn Shay Bradley, Lean Michaeleen Byers, Kallie Hartman, Boey Ho, Dave Hou, Gina Kane, Jean Kim, Brittany Komora, Kayla Perlmutter, Jennifer Tuttle, and Haley Williams for their assistance with data collection and scoring. Most of all, the authors are grateful to the Toronto District School Board and the children and families who participated.
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