Implementation Research: Embracing Practitioners' Views Purpose This research explores practitioners' perspectives during the implementation of triadic gaze intervention (TGI), an evidence-based protocol for assessing and planning treatment targeting gaze as an early signal of intentional communication for young children with physical disabilities. Method Using qualitative methods, 7 practitioners from 1 early intervention center ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 15, 2018
Implementation Research: Embracing Practitioners' Views
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie L. Feuerstein
    Center for Autism and Related Disorders, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD
    Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Lesley B. Olswang
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Kathryn J. Greenslade
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of New Hampshire, Durham
  • Patricia Dowden
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle
  • Gay Lloyd Pinder
    Children's Therapy Center of Kent, WA
  • Jodi Madden
    Kent School District, Renton, WA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Julie Feuerstein: Feuerstein@kennedykrieger.org
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Lisa Archibald
    Editor: Lisa Archibald×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 15, 2018
Implementation Research: Embracing Practitioners' Views
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2018, Vol. 61, 645-657. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0154
History: Received June 20, 2017 , Revised October 6, 2017 , Accepted November 7, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2018, Vol. 61, 645-657. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0154
History: Received June 20, 2017; Revised October 6, 2017; Accepted November 7, 2017

Purpose This research explores practitioners' perspectives during the implementation of triadic gaze intervention (TGI), an evidence-based protocol for assessing and planning treatment targeting gaze as an early signal of intentional communication for young children with physical disabilities.

Method Using qualitative methods, 7 practitioners from 1 early intervention center reported their perceptions about (a) early intervention for young children with physical disabilities, (b) acceptability and feasibility in the use of the TGI protocol in routine practice, and (c) feasibility of the TGI training. Qualitative data were gathered from 2 semistructured group interviews, once before and once after TGI training and implementation.

Results Qualitative results documented the practitioners' reflections on recent changes to early intervention service delivery, the impact of such change on TGI adoption, and an overall strong enthusiasm for the TGI protocol, despite some need for adaptation.

Conclusion These results are discussed relative to adapting the TGI protocol and training, when considering how to best bring about change in practice. More broadly, results highlighted the critical role of researcher–practitioner collaboration in implementation research and the value of qualitative data for gaining a richer understanding of practitioners' perspectives about the implementation process.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Awards UL1 TR002319 (awarded to Lesley B. Olswang) and TL1 TR002318 (awarded to Julie L. Feuerstein). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The authors would like to express their gratitude to the clinicians and families who volunteered their time to contribute to this research.
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