Poor Speech Perception Is Not a Core Deficit of Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Preliminary Findings Purpose Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is hypothesized to arise from deficits in speech motor planning and programming, but the influence of abnormal speech perception in CAS on these processes is debated. This study examined speech perception abilities among children with CAS with and without language impairment compared to those ... Research Note
Research Note  |   March 15, 2018
Poor Speech Perception Is Not a Core Deficit of Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Preliminary Findings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Zuk
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology, Division of Medical Sciences, Harvard University, Boston, MA
  • Jenya Iuzzini-Seigel
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Marquette University, Harriet Barker Cramer Hall, Milwaukee, WI
  • Kathryn Cabbage
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
  • Jordan R. Green
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
    Program in Speech and Hearing Bioscience and Technology, Division of Medical Sciences, Harvard University, Boston, MA
  • Tiffany P. Hogan
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Tiffany Hogan: thogan@mghihp.edu
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Maria Grigos
    Associate Editor: Maria Grigos×
  • Kathryn Cabbage is now at the Department of Communication Disorders at Brigham Young University, Provo, UT.
    Kathryn Cabbage is now at the Department of Communication Disorders at Brigham Young University, Provo, UT.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Hearing & Speech Perception / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   March 15, 2018
Poor Speech Perception Is Not a Core Deficit of Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Preliminary Findings
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2018, Vol. 61, 583-592. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0106
History: Received March 18, 2016 , Revised October 10, 2016 , Accepted October 15, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 2018, Vol. 61, 583-592. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0106
History: Received March 18, 2016; Revised October 10, 2016; Accepted October 15, 2017

Purpose Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is hypothesized to arise from deficits in speech motor planning and programming, but the influence of abnormal speech perception in CAS on these processes is debated. This study examined speech perception abilities among children with CAS with and without language impairment compared to those with language impairment, speech delay, and typically developing peers.

Method Speech perception was measured by discrimination of synthesized speech syllable continua that varied in frequency (/dɑ/–/ɡɑ/). Groups were classified by performance on speech and language assessments and compared on syllable discrimination thresholds. Within-group variability was also evaluated.

Results Children with CAS without language impairment did not significantly differ in syllable discrimination compared to typically developing peers. In contrast, those with CAS and language impairment showed significantly poorer syllable discrimination abilities compared to children with CAS only and typically developing peers. Children with speech delay and language impairment also showed significantly poorer discrimination abilities, with appreciable within-group variability.

Conclusions These findings suggest that speech perception deficits are not a core feature of CAS but rather occur with co-occurring language impairment in a subset of children with CAS. This study establishes the significance of accounting for language ability in children with CAS.

Supplemental Materials https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5848056

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the University of Nebraska Health Research Consortium (Hogan & Green), the National Institutes of Health (R03 DC9667 to Hogan), the Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America (Iuzzini), the Barkley Memorial Trust, and the National Institute of Health Institutional National Research Service Award (NIH T32 DC000038-22 to Zuk).
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