Utterance Duration as It Relates to Communicative Variables in Infant Vocal Development Purpose We aimed to provide novel information on utterance duration as it relates to vocal type, facial affect, gaze direction, and age in the prelinguistic/early linguistic infant. Method Infant utterances were analyzed from longitudinal recordings of 15 infants at 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 months of age. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 15, 2018
Utterance Duration as It Relates to Communicative Variables in Infant Vocal Development
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Heather L. Ramsdell-Hudock
    Idaho State University, Pocatello
  • Andrew Stuart
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Douglas F. Parham
    Wichita State University, KS
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Heather L. Ramsdell-Hudock: ramsdell@isu.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss
    Editor-in-Chief: Julie Liss×
  • Editor: Bharath Chandrasekaran
    Editor: Bharath Chandrasekaran×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 15, 2018
Utterance Duration as It Relates to Communicative Variables in Infant Vocal Development
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2018, Vol. 61, 246-256. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0117
History: Received April 3, 2017 , Revised August 14, 2017 , Accepted October 21, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2018, Vol. 61, 246-256. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-17-0117
History: Received April 3, 2017; Revised August 14, 2017; Accepted October 21, 2017

Purpose We aimed to provide novel information on utterance duration as it relates to vocal type, facial affect, gaze direction, and age in the prelinguistic/early linguistic infant.

Method Infant utterances were analyzed from longitudinal recordings of 15 infants at 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 months of age. Utterance durations were measured and coded for vocal type (i.e., squeal, growl, raspberry, vowel, cry, laugh), facial affect (i.e., positive, negative, neutral), and gaze direction (i.e., to person, to mirror, or not directed).

Results Of the 18,236 utterances analyzed, durations were typically shortest at 14 months of age and longest at 16 months of age. Statistically significant changes were observed in utterance durations across age for all variables of interest.

Conclusion Despite variation in duration of infant utterances, developmental patterns were observed. For these infants, utterance durations appear to become more consolidated later in development, after the 1st year of life. Indeed, 12 months is often noted as the typical age of onset for 1st words and might possibly be a point in time when utterance durations begin to show patterns across communicative variables.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by funding from the Division of Research and Graduate Studies and the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at East Carolina University and from the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Idaho State University. The authors thank the parents and infants who participated and the graduate and undergraduate students who worked diligently to enable the successful completion of this project.
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