A Meta-Analysis: Acoustic Measurement of Roughness and Breathiness Purpose Over the last 5 decades, many acoustic measures have been created to measure roughness and breathiness. The aim of this study is to present a meta-analysis of correlation coefficients (r) between auditory-perceptual judgment of roughness and breathiness and various acoustic measures in both sustained vowels and continuous speech. ... Review Article
Review Article  |   February 15, 2018
A Meta-Analysis: Acoustic Measurement of Roughness and Breathiness
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ben Barsties v. Latoszek
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Belgium
    Institute of Health Studies, HAN University of Applied Sciences, Nijmegen, the Netherlands
  • Youri Maryn
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Belgium
    European Institute for ORL, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium
    Faculty of Education, Health & Social Work, University College Ghent, Belgium
  • Ellen Gerrits
    Faculty of Health Care, HU University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, the Netherlands
    Faculty of Humanities, University of Utrecht, the Netherlands
    Department of Otolaryngology, University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands
  • Marc De Bodt
    Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Belgium
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery, Antwerp University Hospital, Belgium
    Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Ghent, Belgium
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Ben Barsties v. Latoszek: ben.barsties@t-online.de
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Rita Patel
    Associate Editor: Rita Patel×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Review Articles
Review Article   |   February 15, 2018
A Meta-Analysis: Acoustic Measurement of Roughness and Breathiness
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2018, Vol. 61, 298-323. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0188
History: Received May 9, 2016 , Revised January 31, 2017 , Accepted October 25, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2018, Vol. 61, 298-323. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0188
History: Received May 9, 2016; Revised January 31, 2017; Accepted October 25, 2017

Purpose Over the last 5 decades, many acoustic measures have been created to measure roughness and breathiness. The aim of this study is to present a meta-analysis of correlation coefficients (r) between auditory-perceptual judgment of roughness and breathiness and various acoustic measures in both sustained vowels and continuous speech.

Method Scientific literature reporting perceptual–acoustic correlations on roughness and breathiness were sought in 28 databases. Weighted average correlation coefficients (r w) were calculated when multiple r-values were available for a specific acoustic marker. An r w ≥ .60 was the threshold for an acoustic measure to be considered acceptable.

Results From 103 studies of roughness and 107 studies of breathiness that were investigated, only 33 studies and 34 studies, respectively, met the inclusion criteria of the meta-analysis on sustained vowels. Eighty-six acoustic measures were identified for roughness and 85 acoustic measures for breathiness on sustained vowels, in which 43 and 39 measures, respectively, yielded multiple r-values. Finally, only 14 measures for roughness and 12 measures for breathiness produced r w ≥ .60. On continuous speech, 4 measures for roughness and 21 measures for breathiness were identified, yielding 3 and 6 measures, respectively, with multiple r-values in which only 1 and 2, respectively, had r w ≥ .60.

Conclusion This meta-analysis showed that only a few acoustic parameters were determined as the best estimators for roughness and breathiness.

Acknowledgments
The authors thank Peter Pabon (Department of Sonology, Royal Conservatory, The Hague, the Netherlands) for his support in the extra information on the functions of the several acoustic parameters.
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