Changing the Subject: The Place of Revisions in Grammatical Development Purpose This article focuses on toddlers' revisions of the sentence subject and tests the hypothesis that subject diversity (i.e., the number of different subjects produced) increases the probability of subject revision. Method One-hour language samples were collected from 61 children (32 girls) at 27 months. Spontaneously produced, active ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 15, 2018
Changing the Subject: The Place of Revisions in Grammatical Development
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Matthew Rispoli
    Department of Speech and Hearing Science, University of Illinois, Champaign
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to: Matthew Rispoli: mrispoli@illinois.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Megan Dunn Davison
    Editor: Megan Dunn Davison×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 15, 2018
Changing the Subject: The Place of Revisions in Grammatical Development
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2018, Vol. 61, 360-372. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0216
History: Received June 2, 2017 , Revised August 4, 2017 , Accepted September 5, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2018, Vol. 61, 360-372. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0216
History: Received June 2, 2017; Revised August 4, 2017; Accepted September 5, 2017
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This article focuses on toddlers' revisions of the sentence subject and tests the hypothesis that subject diversity (i.e., the number of different subjects produced) increases the probability of subject revision.

Method One-hour language samples were collected from 61 children (32 girls) at 27 months. Spontaneously produced, active declarative sentences (ADSs) were analyzed for subject diversity and the presence of subject revision and repetition. The number of different words produced, mean length of utterance, tense/agreement productivity score, and the number of ADSs were also measured.

Results Regression analyses were performed with revision and repetition as the dependent variables. Subject diversity significantly predicted the probability of revision, whereas the number of ADSs predicted the probability of repetition.

Conclusion The results support the hypothesis that subject diversity increases the probability of subject revision. It is proposed that lexical diversity within specific syntactic positions is the primary mechanism whereby revision rates increase with grammatical development. The results underscore the need to differentiate repetition from revision in the classification of disfluencies.

Acknowledgments
The author acknowledges the support of a National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R15DC005374-01 for the collection of the DeKalb cohort data and the support (awarded to Matthew Rispoli [PI]) of a National Science Foundation Grant BCS-082251 (awarded to Matthew Rispoli and Pamela Hadley [co-PI]) for the collection of the Champaign cohort data. Collection of the DeKalb cohort data was conducted while the author was a faculty member at Northern Illinois University. The author would like to thank Emily Nierman and Hannah Simmons for their work on coding and reliability and Pamela Hadley for her comments and criticism.
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