Convergent and Divergent Validity of the Grammaticality and Utterance Length Instrument Purpose This feasibility study examines the convergent and divergent validity of the Grammaticality and Utterance Length Instrument (GLi), a tool designed to assess the grammaticality and average utterance length of a child's prerecorded story retell. Method Three raters used the GLi to rate audio-recorded story retells from 100 ... Research Note
Research Note  |   January 22, 2018
Convergent and Divergent Validity of the Grammaticality and Utterance Length Instrument
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anny Castilla-Earls
    University of Houston, TX
  • Katrina Fulcher-Rood
    SUNY Buffalo State, NY
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Anny Castilla-Earls: anny.castilla@gmail.com
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Geralyn Timler
    Editor: Geralyn Timler×
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Notes
Research Note   |   January 22, 2018
Convergent and Divergent Validity of the Grammaticality and Utterance Length Instrument
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2018, Vol. 61, 120-129. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0152
History: Received April 20, 2017 , Revised August 16, 2017 , Accepted September 26, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2018, Vol. 61, 120-129. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0152
History: Received April 20, 2017; Revised August 16, 2017; Accepted September 26, 2017

Purpose This feasibility study examines the convergent and divergent validity of the Grammaticality and Utterance Length Instrument (GLi), a tool designed to assess the grammaticality and average utterance length of a child's prerecorded story retell.

Method Three raters used the GLi to rate audio-recorded story retells from 100 English-speaking preschool children. To examine convergent validity, the results of the GLi were correlated with 2 language sample measures, mean length of utterance in words and percentage of grammatical utterances, and with the results of the Structured Photographic Expressive Language Test–Third Edition (Dawson, Stout, & Eyer, 2003). To examine divergent validity, the results of the GLi were correlated with the results of the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test–Second Edition (Kaufman & Kaufman, 2004) . Comparisons between task completion time for the GLi and Systematic Analysis of Language Transcripts (SALT; Miller & Iglesias, 2010) transcription and analysis were also conducted. Last, preliminary discriminant analysis was used to examine the diagnostic potential of the GLi.

Results The results of this study provide evidence of convergent and divergent validity for the GLi. The task completion time for the GLi was considerably shorter than the SALT transcription and analysis. Preliminary analysis of diagnostic accuracy suggests that the GLi has the potential to be a good tool to identify children with language impairment.

Discussion The GLi has good convergent and divergent validity and is a reliable instrument to assess utterance length and grammaticality of prerecorded language samples. However, SALT transcription and analysis provide a more detailed and comprehensive analysis of the language skills of a child.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank Marissa Michalski, Emily Donals, Sarah DeCock, Emily Ackles, Jaimie Harris, and Heidi Gawron for their assistance with the research presented in this study. We would also like to thank the children who participated in this study and the schools who made data collection for this study possible.
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