Do Transmasculine Speakers Present With Gender-Related Voice Problems? Insights From a Participant-Centered Mixed-Methods Study Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are indications of gender-related voice problems in our transmasculine participants and to analyze how discrepancies between participant self-evaluations and researcher-led examinations can be best negotiated to ensure a participant-centered interpretation. Method We conducted a participant-centered mixed-methods study ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 22, 2018
Do Transmasculine Speakers Present With Gender-Related Voice Problems? Insights From a Participant-Centered Mixed-Methods Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Azul
    Discipline of Speech Pathology, Department of Community and Allied Health, La Trobe Rural Health School, College of Science, Health, and Engineering, La Trobe University, Bendigo, Australia
  • Aron Arnold
    Laboratoire de phonétique et phonologie, UMR 7018–Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique & Université Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris, France
  • Christiane Neuschaefer-Rube
    Clinic of Phoniatrics, Pedaudiology and Communication Disorders, Medical Faculty and University Hospital of the RWTH Aachen University, Germany
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to David Azul: D.Azul@latrobe.edu.au
  • Editor: Julie Liss
    Editor: Julie Liss×
  • Associate Editor: Jack Jiang
    Associate Editor: Jack Jiang×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Article
Research Article   |   January 22, 2018
Do Transmasculine Speakers Present With Gender-Related Voice Problems? Insights From a Participant-Centered Mixed-Methods Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2018, Vol. 61, 25-39. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0410
History: Received October 28, 2016 , Revised March 20, 2017 , Accepted August 31, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2018, Vol. 61, 25-39. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-S-16-0410
History: Received October 28, 2016; Revised March 20, 2017; Accepted August 31, 2017
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are indications of gender-related voice problems in our transmasculine participants and to analyze how discrepancies between participant self-evaluations and researcher-led examinations can be best negotiated to ensure a participant-centered interpretation.

Method We conducted a participant-centered mixed-methods study combining qualitative content analyses of semistructured interviews, acoustical voice analyses, and an examination of gender attributions to voice. Fourteen German-speaking transmasculine people, 14 cisfemale control persons, and 7 cismale control persons participated. The data were examined for indications of gender-related voice problems pertaining to vocal gender presentation and gender attribution to voice received from others.

Results Eleven participants (79%) presented with indications of gender-related voice problems. Problems included dissatisfaction with gender-related voice features, difficulties with control of vocal gender presentation, and mismatch between desired gender attribution and gender attributions received from others. Discrepancies between participant self-evaluations and researcher-led examinations were observed in a number of cases.

Conclusion Transmasculine speakers may experience a range of gender-related voice problems. Research and clinical practice with transmasculine people need to be adapted to better match the diversity of the population and the complexity of the processes that shape the production of speaker vocal gender in interaction.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a La Trobe University College of Science, Health and Engineering collaboration visit grant to David Azul and by a La Trobe University Research Focus Area Transforming Human Societies visiting research fellowship grant to Aron Arnold.
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