The Relationship Between Motor Delays and Language Development in Very Low Birthweight Premature Children at 18 Months Corrected Age Purpose The aim of this study is to determine if there is a specific association between motor delays and receptive and expressive language function, respectively, in prematurely born children. Method Retrospective data review: 126 premature children ≤ 1,250-g birthweight from English-speaking families were evaluated on motor development (normal, ... Research Note
Research Note  |   January 22, 2018
The Relationship Between Motor Delays and Language Development in Very Low Birthweight Premature Children at 18 Months Corrected Age
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gail Ross
    Department of Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY
  • Rebecca Demaria
    Department of Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY
  • Vivien Yap
    Department of Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Gail Ross: gsross@med.cornell.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond
    Editor-in-Chief: Sean Redmond×
  • Editor: Margaret Kjelgaard
    Editor: Margaret Kjelgaard×
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Language / Research Notes
Research Note   |   January 22, 2018
The Relationship Between Motor Delays and Language Development in Very Low Birthweight Premature Children at 18 Months Corrected Age
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2018, Vol. 61, 114-119. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0056
History: Received February 8, 2017 , Revised May 31, 2017 , Accepted August 21, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2018, Vol. 61, 114-119. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-17-0056
History: Received February 8, 2017; Revised May 31, 2017; Accepted August 21, 2017

Purpose The aim of this study is to determine if there is a specific association between motor delays and receptive and expressive language function, respectively, in prematurely born children.

Method Retrospective data review: 126 premature children ≤ 1,250-g birthweight from English-speaking families were evaluated on motor development (normal, mild delay, and moderate–severe delay) and the cognitive and language scales of the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development–Third Edition (Bayley, 2006) at 18 months corrected age. Cognitive scores were categorized as normal, suspect, and abnormal. Gender, demographic, and perinatal variables were recorded and analyzed with respect to motor category.

Results Lower birthweight, chronic need for oxygen, severe intraventricular hemorrhage, and intestinal infection/inflammation were related to poorer motor development. On receptive language, the normal motor group attained significantly higher scores than the moderate–severe motor group but did not differ significantly from the mild delay motor group. On expressive language, the normal motor group had significantly higher scores than both the mild and moderate–severe groups. Girls performed better than boys on receptive and expressive language, but there was no significant interaction between gender and motor category on any of the Bayley scores. Cognitive, but not motor, category significantly contributed to variance of receptive language scores; cognitive and motor category each independently contributed to the variance in expressive language.

Conclusion Findings suggest that motor control areas of the brain may be implicated in expressive language development of premature children. Further research is needed to determine the underlying factors for the association between motor and expressive language function.

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