Predicting Response to Treatment in a Tier 2 Supplemental Vocabulary Intervention Purpose To effectively implement a response to intervention approach, there is a need for timely and specific information about student learning in response to treatment to ensure that treatment decisions are appropriate. This exploratory study examined responsivity to a supplemental, Tier 2 vocabulary intervention delivered to preschool children with limited ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 22, 2018
Predicting Response to Treatment in a Tier 2 Supplemental Vocabulary Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth Kelley
    Department of Communication Science and Disorders, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Emily Leary
    Department of Biostatistics and Research Design, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Howard Goldstein
    College of Behavioral and Community Sciences, University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Disclosure: Howard Goldstein is an author of Story Friends and has a financial interest, as he receives royalties from sales of this product through Paul Brookes Publishing. This interest has been reviewed by the University in accordance with its Individual Conflict of Interest policy, for the purpose of maintaining the objectivity and the integrity of research at the University of South Florida.
    Disclosure: Howard Goldstein is an author of Story Friends and has a financial interest, as he receives royalties from sales of this product through Paul Brookes Publishing. This interest has been reviewed by the University in accordance with its Individual Conflict of Interest policy, for the purpose of maintaining the objectivity and the integrity of research at the University of South Florida. ×
    Elizabeth Kelley is an author of Story Friends and has a financial interest, as she receives royalties from sales of this produce through Paul Brookes Publishing.
    Elizabeth Kelley is an author of Story Friends and has a financial interest, as she receives royalties from sales of this produce through Paul Brookes Publishing. ×
  • Correspondence to Elizabeth Kelley: kelleyej@missouri.edu
  • Editor: Sean Redmond
    Editor: Sean Redmond×
  • Associate Editor: Patricia Eadie
    Associate Editor: Patricia Eadie×
Article Information
Development / School-Based Settings / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 22, 2018
Predicting Response to Treatment in a Tier 2 Supplemental Vocabulary Intervention
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2018, Vol. 61, 94-103. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0399
History: Received October 12, 2016 , Revised June 27, 2017 , Accepted September 8, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, January 2018, Vol. 61, 94-103. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-L-16-0399
History: Received October 12, 2016; Revised June 27, 2017; Accepted September 8, 2017

Purpose To effectively implement a response to intervention approach, there is a need for timely and specific information about student learning in response to treatment to ensure that treatment decisions are appropriate. This exploratory study examined responsivity to a supplemental, Tier 2 vocabulary intervention delivered to preschool children with limited language abilities.

Method A secondary analysis of a cluster-randomized trial of a supplemental vocabulary intervention was conducted. Responsivity (e.g., adequate learning) to the intervention was examined, and learning in the 1st few weeks of intervention was evaluated as a possible predictor of response to intervention.

Results Using a criterion of learning of 20% of target vocabulary, nearly one third of participants were identified as poor responders. A 1st unit benchmark was identified that maximized the sensitivity to identification of children who were likely to respond to the intervention.

Conclusions Even for generally effective interventions, there is likely to be a substantial proportion of children who are not responsive. Learning in the 1st few weeks of intervention may be a useful indicator of appropriate response to treatment and could inform instructional decisions.

Acknowledgments
This research was partially supported by grants from the United States Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, R432A150132 awarded to the University of South Florida and R324C080011 awarded to the University of Kansas.
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