Investigating Relationships Between Maternal Input and Rate of Children’s Language Development A Reanalysis of Yoder Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   April 01, 1991
Investigating Relationships Between Maternal Input and Rate of Children’s Language Development
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brian J. Richards
    University of Reading England
Article Information
Language / Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   April 01, 1991
Investigating Relationships Between Maternal Input and Rate of Children’s Language Development
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 347-350. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.347
History: Received April 16, 1990 , Accepted September 4, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1991, Vol. 34, 347-350. doi:10.1044/jshr.3402.347
History: Received April 16, 1990; Accepted September 4, 1990
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2
A recent study by Yoder (1989)  examined relationships between maternal questions addressed to five specific language-disordered children and the children’s later usage of auxiliary and copula verbs.
The relationship between variation in input and differences in rate of language development has been a legitimate focus of investigation for over 20 years. Both correlational research (e.g. Barnes, Gutfreund, Satterly, & Wells, 1983; Newport, Gleitman, & Gleitman, 1977) and experimental studies (e.g. Nelson, Carskaddon, & Bonvillian, 1973) have identified facilitative features in the input to children developing a first language normally. These findings have been influential in the fields of therapy, education of the deaf, second language acquisition, and mainstream kindergarten and elementary school teaching.
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