Comments on Postma & Kolk’s “The Covert Repair Hypothesis: Prearticulatory Repair Processes in Normal and Stuttered Disfluencles” (1993) I should like to comment on several references to my concepts made in the interesting article by Postma and Kolk (1993) . In the middle of the section of their article that begins on page 483 the authors indicate that I (Wingate, 1988) “seem to be referring mostly to… phonological elaboration…” ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   June 01, 1994
Comments on Postma & Kolk’s “The Covert Repair Hypothesis: Prearticulatory Repair Processes in Normal and Stuttered Disfluencles” (1993)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marcel E. Wingate
    Washington State University Pullman
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   June 01, 1994
Comments on Postma & Kolk’s “The Covert Repair Hypothesis: Prearticulatory Repair Processes in Normal and Stuttered Disfluencles” (1993)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1994, Vol. 37, 581. doi:10.1044/jshr.3703.581a
History: Received September 20, 1993 , Accepted November 16, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1994, Vol. 37, 581. doi:10.1044/jshr.3703.581a
History: Received September 20, 1993; Accepted November 16, 1993
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1
I should like to comment on several references to my concepts made in the interesting article by Postma and Kolk (1993) .
In the middle of the section of their article that begins on page 483 the authors indicate that I (Wingate, 1988) “seem to be referring mostly to… phonological elaboration…” My analysis (in Wingate, 1988) does not intend such reference. Also, I did not say, and would not imply, that “… representation of the non-initial phonemes is impoverished… [which]… thus deteriorates their [stutterers’] phonological encoding processes.” Overall, I do not speak about phonemes, or phones, per se. I speak only of syllable onset (which may have more than one phone) and rime (which most often does). The only phone that attracts my attention is (whatever) vowel-form happens to be in the rime, and then only because it is the syllable nucleus. We still have only a very hazy notion of language processes, including how the lexicon is organized and the way in which retrieval or restructuring takes place. From my understanding of the relevant literature I have been inclined to infer that syllable nuclei, somehow by virtue of their significant participation in prosody, are focal in these processes.
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