Speech Perception Training Can Facilitate Sound Production Learning This study examined the role of speech perception training in the correction of phonological errors. Twenty-seven preschoolers with phonological impairment who misarticulated /∫/ were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Group 1 children listened to a variety of correctly and incorrectly produced versions of the word “shoe”; Group 2 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 1994
Speech Perception Training Can Facilitate Sound Production Learning
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Rvachew
    Alberta Children’s Hospital Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Contact author: Susan Rvachew, M.Sc, Child Health Centre, Alberta Children’s Hospital, 1820 Richmond Road, SW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2T 5C7. Email: srvachew@acs.ucalgary.ca.
Article Information
Development / Hearing & Speech Perception / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 1994
Speech Perception Training Can Facilitate Sound Production Learning
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 347-357. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.347
History: Received September 16, 1992 , Accepted September 17, 1993
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 1994, Vol. 37, 347-357. doi:10.1044/jshr.3702.347
History: Received September 16, 1992; Accepted September 17, 1993

This study examined the role of speech perception training in the correction of phonological errors. Twenty-seven preschoolers with phonological impairment who misarticulated /∫/ were randomly assigned to one of three groups: Group 1 children listened to a variety of correctly and incorrectly produced versions of the word “shoe”; Group 2 children listened to the words “shoe” and “moo”; Group 3 children listened to the words “cat” and “Pete.” A computer game was used to provide reinforcement for correct identification of the words. All children received the same traditional sound production training program for correction of their /∫/ error, concurrently with speech perception training, during six weekly treatment sessions. On post-testing, Group 1 and 2 children demonstrated a superior ability to articulate the target sound in comparison to Group 3 children. The results are interpreted in relation to previous research on this topic.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant to the author from the M.S.I. Foundation. I am also grateful to Dr. E. S. Edgington for his advice regarding the statistical analysis, to Dr. E. Slawinski for her advice regarding the acoustic analyses, to Dr. D. G. Jamieson and Peter Bangarth (Hearing Health Care Research Unit, University of Western Ontario) for software support, to Tom Milutinovic (Pennan Inc.) for his delightful art work, to Michelle Gaffney for her excellent services as a research assistant, and to Norma Wood, director, and staff at the Alberta Children’s Hospital Speech-Language Department for numerous forms of support throughout the duration of this project.
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