Remote Microphone System Use at Home: Impact on Caregiver Talk Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of home use of a remote microphone system (RMS) on the spoken language production of caregivers with young children who have hearing loss. Method Language Environment Analysis recorders were used with 10 families during 2 consecutive weekends ... Research Article
Newly Published
Research Article  |   January 12, 2018
Remote Microphone System Use at Home: Impact on Caregiver Talk
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carlos R. Benítez-Barrera
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Gina P. Angley
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Anne Marie Tharpe
    Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Disclosure: This article was funded by Phonak, who provided equipment for use in this study.
    Disclosure: This article was funded by Phonak, who provided equipment for use in this study. ×
  • Correspondence to Carlos R. Benitez-Barrera: carlos.r.benitez@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun
    Editor-in-Chief: Frederick (Erick) Gallun×
  • Editor: Steve Aiken
    Editor: Steve Aiken×
Article Information
Newly Published / Research Article
Research Article   |   January 12, 2018
Remote Microphone System Use at Home: Impact on Caregiver Talk
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0168
History: Received May 3, 2017 , Revised August 20, 2017 , Accepted September 15, 2017
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, Newly Published. doi:10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-17-0168
History: Received May 3, 2017; Revised August 20, 2017; Accepted September 15, 2017

Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of home use of a remote microphone system (RMS) on the spoken language production of caregivers with young children who have hearing loss.

Method Language Environment Analysis recorders were used with 10 families during 2 consecutive weekends (RMS weekend and No-RMS weekend). The amount of talk from a single caregiver that could be made accessible to children with hearing loss when using an RMS was estimated using Language Environment Analysis software. The total amount of caregiver talk (close and far talk) was also compared across both weekends. In addition, caregivers' perceptions of RMS use were gathered.

Results Children, with the use of RMSs, could potentially have access to approximately 42% more words per day. In addition, although caregivers produced an equivalent number of words on both weekends, they tended to talk more from a distance when using the RMS than when not. Finally, caregivers reported positive perceived communication benefits of RMS use.

Conclusions Findings from this investigation suggest that children with hearing loss have increased access to caregiver talk when using an RMS in the home environment. Clinical implications and future directions for research are discussed.

Acknowledgments
We want to thank Drs. Tiffany Woynaroski, Melanie Schuele, and Rene Gifford for their collaboration on this project. We also want to thank Kim Coulter for her support as a LENA consultant, Phonak LLC, and Phonak AG for providing the equipment and funding for this project. Finally, we are grateful to all the families who participated in this study and the staff at the Mama Lere Hearing School for their assistance in recruitment.
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